perseverate


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perseverate

(pər-sĕv′ə-rāt′)
intr.v. persever·ated, persever·ating, persever·ates Psychology
To manifest or experience perseveration.

per·sev′er·a′tive adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, one hallmark of compromised executive control is reduced flexibility and the subsequent increased tendency to perseverate, particularly when a task is unfamiliar (see Miller & Cohen, 2001).
They may perseverate on specific topics or activities, and often become easily frustrated with activities that require sustained attention to complex stimuli.
Stability properties also explain that organisms tend to specialize in entrenched behaviors and may perseverate in such behaviors even when the environment changes (Gall, 1978).
A tendency to give concrete answers and to perseverate was noted for both throughout the testing.
For both clients who have difficulty with long periods of time to talk, and for those who perseverate on subjects for a long period of time, it is important to set session goals each time.
Vos inquit Senenses ad dexteram constituti estis perseverate ad dexteram et vos mea conservate, quam bene statis in presentia et salvabimini."
In the same vein, see "non tiriate mai addietro, ma sempre perseverate ogni otta che vedeste la cosa piu fredda, infino che vediamo spargere il sangue con dolci e amorosi desideri" (par.
To clarify concerns, I am careful in my book not to make any FASD diagnoses, taking great care to investigate the evidence of prenatal exposure to alcohol and behavioral characteristics (including perseveration, a trait seen when shooters perseverate or "plan" the event).
Social media outlets have provided a means to perseverate and implicate others remotely, however, and Mr.
Tablet computers that have a digital pen can be a valuable resource for students who perseverate and repeatedly erase answers or who have fine motor control problems.
These hyperconnectivities are often interpreted as reflecting rumination, where individuals perseverate on negative, self-referential thoughts, i.e., repetitively and passively focus on symptoms of distress and on the possible causes and consequences of these symptoms.
Steven's speech tended to perseverate on topics of particular interest to himself; in addition, he frequently applied inappropriate verb tense during speech episodes.