peroneal

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peroneal

 [per″o-ne´al]
2. pertaining to the outer aspect of the leg.

fib·u·lar

(fib'yū-lăr), [TA]
1. Relating to the fibula. Synonym(s): fibularis [TA], peroneal, peronealis
2. Lateral in position within the leg.
[L. fibularis]

peroneal

/per·o·ne·al/ (-ne´al) pertaining to the fibula or to the lateral aspect of the leg; fibular.

peroneal

(pĕr′ə-nē′əl)
adj.
Of or relating to the fibula or to the outer portion of the leg.

peroneal

[per′ənē′əl]
Etymology: Gk, perone, brooch
pertaining to the outer part of the leg, over the fibula and the peroneal nerve.

peroneal

adjective Referring to the lateral compartment of the leg; fibular.

per·o·ne·al

(per'ŏ-nē'ăl)
Relating to the fibula, to the lateral side of the leg, or to the muscles there present.
[L. peroneus, fr. G. peronē, fibula]

peroneal

Pertaining to the outer side of the leg or to the FIBULA.

peroneal

pertaining to the fibula or to the outer side of the leg or shank; fibular.

common peroneal nerve
a nerve originating in the sciatic nerve; innervates parts of the calf and foot. See also Table 14.
peroneal muscles
see Table 13.4.
peroneal nerve block
achieved by injection of a local anesthetic into the groove between the tendons of long and lateral digital extensors on the hindlimb, usually in a horse. Anesthesia is obtained mainly over the craniolateral surface of the limb distal to this site and over the medial fetlock.
peroneal nerve paralysis
causes a characteristic inability to flex the hock and extend the digits so the animal bears weight on the dorsum of the foot. There is anesthesia of the cranial leg and dorsal paw or foot. Occurs in recumbent cattle and from trauma to the lateral stifle in dogs.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, as a result of their negative findings, Isakov et al (1986) challenged the importance of peroneal reflex response time measures in mediating ankle sprain injuries, stating that ligamentous damage at the ankle probably occurs before the peroneal muscles can be recruited.
Isakov E, Mizrahi J, Solzi P, Susak Z and Lotem M (1986): Response of peroneal muscles to sudden inversion of the ankle.
Johnson MB and Johnson CL (1993): Electromyographic response of peroneal muscles in surgical and nonsurgical injured ankles during sudden inversion.
Further, although ankle taping (Karlsson and Andreasson 1992, Refshauge et al 2000) and training to reduce peroneal muscle response times have been advocated for reducing or preventing functional instability of the ankle (Sheth et al 1997), neurophysiological responses to sudden ankle inversion movements are not necessarily improved by ankle taping (Allison et al 1999).
Other hypothesised ankle sprain mechanisms have included: mechanical hypermobility of the ankle joint (Richie 2001), subtalar instability (Karlsson et al 1997), neural transmission deficits (Pahor and Toppenberg 1996), nerve damage (Kleinrensink et al 1994), peroneal muscle weakness (Tropp 1986) or subluxation (Hintermann 1999), sinus tarsi syndrome (Renstrom and Konradsen 1997), defects of body mechanics (Watson 1995), increases in joint laxity (Cornwall and Murrell 1991), deficiencies in ankle invertor muscle function (Hall et al 1999, Wilkerson et al 1997), increased touchdown plantar flexion responses (Wright et al 2000), severe fatigue of peroneous longus (Gefen 2002), and muscle inversion-eversion and plantarflexion-dorsiflexion strength imbalances (Baumhauer et al 1995).
Some patients may have accompanying nerve deafness and atrophy of the peroneal muscles.
1995), weakness of the peroneal muscles (Tropp, 1986; Wilkerson et al.
2002), decreased tension of peroneal muscles (Tropp, 1986; Wilkerson et al.