permissive

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permissive

(pər-mĭs′ĭv)
adj.
1.
a. Granting or inclined to grant permission; tolerant or lenient: permissive parents.
b. Characterized by freedom of personal behavior or a disregard of traditional social mores.
2. Permitted or optional: permissive uses of funds.
3. Biology Supporting viral replication. Used of a cell.

per·mis′sive·ly adv.
per·mis′sive·ness n.
References in periodicals archive ?
At the concurrent time point (Model 1), permissiveness to regular drug use, permissiveness to occasional drug use, life satisfaction, and depression were significantly related to drug use in the last 30 days.
Collectively, the ten categories in Table 1 provide an analytical framework by which to measure parentage permissiveness across jurisdictions.
These positive responses to the ethical demands of life automatically empowers one to say a firm 'no' to irresponsible sexual behaviour, pre-marital and extra-marital sex, promiscuity, permissiveness, pornography, prostitution or any other perverted sexual engagement.
Like von Trier, his nymphomaniac tries to outrun social permissiveness in chase of the vanishing forbidden.
Because several of the ungulate cell lines had not previously been used for viral infection experiments, we determined permissiveness of all cell lines for Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) clone 13, a virus mutant known to be attenuated yet broadly infectious for ungulate cell lines (13).
Specifically, their results showed decreased permissiveness and increased belief in treatment interventions.
The aim of the present study is to analyze the predictive capacity of young people's perception of their parents permissiveness toward drug use, the affect parents show and the control parents exert regarding to their own use of alcohol, tobacco and cannabis use.
And Frank Mort's recent Capital Affairs (Yale, 2010) similarly questions historians' understanding of permissiveness in mid-century Britain.
The present study sought to determine whether Anglo-Canadians and Franco-Quebecois students differed with respect to sexual guilt and whether these potential differences would be mediated by differences in parental sexual permissiveness and religiosity.
found a significant negative correlation between mothers' permissiveness and adult daughters' ability to self-regulate.