permissive hypercapnia


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permissive hypercapnia

ventilation that allows PaCO2 to rise slowly over time as the pH becomes normalized. The goal is to reduce tidal volume and rate while preventing volutrauma during mechanical ventilation. Patients may need to be sedated during this.

permissive hypercapnia

Critical care An approach to management of acute respiratory failure in which the tidal volume–VT is lower–5-8 mL/kg than that conventionally used–10-15 mL/kg, the arterial Pco2 is allowed to rise above the 'normal' of 40 mm Hg, and no attempts are made to compensate for subsequent changes in blood pH–respiratory acidosis, the deleterious effects of which may have been overestimated

permissive hypercapnia

Intentional limiting of airway pressures and tidal volumes during mechanical ventilation, thereby allowing PaCO2 to rise above normal, in order to minimize the risk of lung injury.

CAUTION!

Permissive hypercapnia should be avoided in patients who may not tolerate high carbon dioxide levels or acidosis, e.g., patients with sickle cell anemia or those with high intracranial pressures.
See also: hypercapnia
References in periodicals archive ?
Effects of permissive hypercapnia on transient global cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats.
In a more recent editorial discussing therapeutic hypercapnia and sepsis, (3) Swenson, while acknowledging that permissive hypercapnia can have a positive effect in some cases, posed a caution: There is a concern that "therapeutic hypercapnia may impair host defenses against pathogens surely to be encountered by mechanically ventilated patients.
And yet, with this ability to measure blood-gas parameters, it was almost 30 years before permissive hypercapnia was studied, he adds.
The impact of permissive hypercapnia on laboratories that perform blood-gas analysis likely goes beyond just knowing what values to expect from a given patient population.
Permissive hypercapnia should not be used on patients who have an elevated intracranial pressure because the high PaCO2 may increase cerebral perfusion significantly.
The results showed that, in the limited-ventilation group, permissive hypercapnia (arterial carbon dioxide tension >50 mmHg) was more common (52 vs 28% P=0.
Tromethamine buffer modifies the depressant effect of permissive hypercapnia on myocardial contractility in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome.