permeate

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permeate

 [per´me-āt″]
1. to penetrate or pass through, as through a filter.
2. the constituents of a solution or suspension that pass through a filter.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

per·me·ate

(per'mē-āt),
1. To pass through a membrane or other structure, typically by diffusion.
2. That which can so pass.
[L. permeo, to pass through]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

permeate

(pûr′mē-āt′)
v. perme·ated, perme·ating, perme·ates
v.tr.
1. To pass through the openings or interstices of: liquid permeating a membrane.
2. To spread or flow throughout; pervade: "Our thinking is permeated by our historical myths" (Freeman J. Dyson).
v.intr.
To spread through or penetrate something.

per′me·ant (-ənt), per′me·a′tive (-ā′tĭv) adj.
per′me·a′tion n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

per·me·ate

(pĕr'mē-āt, -ăt)
1. To pass through a membrane or other structure.
2. That which can so pass.
[L. permeo, to pass through]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Tumors may be sclerotic (contained in a scleroticized rind), usually in combination with moth-eaten or permeative bone destruction.
Furthermore, the relation cannot be located at that region on the permeative model.
Osteosarcomas, as opposed to bone island, show aggressive growth, with cortical destruction, interrupted periosteal reaction, a soft tissue mass, and permeative growth within the bone marrow.
This contrasts with "the Chinese-Vietnamese formula of direct, permeative, bureaucratic management", with the emphasis on bureaucracy.
(13) The tumour may involve both the extraconal and intraconal compartment, many cause permeative bone destruction (50%).
When a mixed lytic and sclerotic, motheaten, or permeative appearance is identified with cortical disruption and complex periosteal reaction in a young patient, diagnostic considerations may include osteosarcoma, Ewing's sarcoma, active osteomyelitis, and Langerhans cell histiocytosis.
(13) Cortical destruction is invariably present, with the pattern of bone destruction described as geographic, moth-eaten, and/or permeative. A Codman triangle signifying periosteal new bone formation is a common occurrence.
Radiographic evaluation with plain films revealed a permeative, moth-eaten lesion of the left proximal tibia.
Permeative bone destruction is another recognized pattern of osseous involvement which often has associated periosteal reaction and soft tissue disease.
The lesions may also appear as permeative lesions with ill-defined borders and periosteal reaction.
(11) Important histologic features that distinguish it from osteoblastoma include presence of a compact solid proliferation of neoplastic cells in between the bony trabeculae (unlike the single row of osteoblasts seen in osteoblastoma), permeative growth or infiltration beyond the confines of the tumor into adjacent bone or soft tissue, and high mitotic rate.
Classically, Ewing's is described as a diaphyseal-based, permeative lesion with a wide ZOT and aggressive periostitis (Figure 13).