deformation

(redirected from permanent deformation)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to permanent deformation: Plastic deformation

deformation

 [de″for-ma´shun]
1. deformity, especially an alteration in shape or structure.
2. the process of adapting in shape or form.
elastic deformation temporary elongation of tissue when a prolonged force has been applied. See also creep.
plastic deformation permanent elongation of tissue when a prolonged nondisruptive mechanical force has been applied. See also creep.

de·for·ma·tion

(dē'fōr-mā'shŭn),
1. Deviation of form from normal; specifically, an alteration in shape and/or structure of an organ or other body part; etiology may be developmental, posttraumatic, hereditary, or postsurgical, or due to pathologic conditions in adjacent structures (for example, compression by a tumor mass).
2. In rheology, the change in the physical shape of a mass by applied stress.
[L. de-formo, pp. -atus, to deform, fr. forma, form]

deformation

(dē′fôr-mā′shən, dĕf′ər-)
n.
1.
a. The act or process of deforming.
b. The condition of being deformed.
2. An alteration of form for the worse.
3. Physics
a. An alteration of shape, as by pressure or stress.
b. The shape that results from such an alteration.

de′for·ma′tion·al adj.
Any change in the normal size or shape of a part

deformation

Deformity Neonatology A change from the normal size or shape of a part that differentiates normally, but cannot develop fully due to in utero constraints–eg, compression, or oligohydramnios. See Defect, Dysmorphology.

de·for·ma·tion

(dē-fōr-mā'shŭn)
1. Deviation of form from normal; specifically, an alteration in shape or structure of a previously normally formed part. It occurs after organogenesis and often involves the musculoskeletal system (e.g., clubfoot).
2. Synonym(s): deformity.
3. rheology The change in the physical shape of a mass by applied stress.
[L. de-formo, pp. -atus, to deform, fr. forma, form]

de·for·ma·tion

(dē-fōr-mā'shŭn)
Deviation of form from normal; specifically, an alteration in shape and/or structure of a body part.
[L. de-formo, pp. -atus, to deform, fr. forma, form]
References in periodicals archive ?
The figures showed that the fatigue accumulated strain of the specimen resulted in a proportional correlation with the creep permanent deformation of the mixes, whereas an inverse correlation was obtained between the fatigue and stiffness properties.
The resistance to permanent deformation in asphalt mixtures was enhanced by the addition of the DCLR and DCLRcomposite in the base asphalt mixture.
Thus, the presence of binder modified by prelending with fine rubber powders improved the resistance to permanent deformation by nearly three times that of unmodified bituminous mixes.
Increasing the polymer concentration from 2.5%w to 3.8%w more than doubles the resistance to permanent deformation of the HMA.
The major objective of this research is to examine the influence rules of the factors such as cyclic stress amplitude, initial mean stress, and stress ratio and to develop an improved empirical model for capturing the permanent deformation behavior of coarse grained soils under train-induced repeated loading.
Mahmoud, "Effects of coarse aggregate angularity and asphalt binder on laboratory-measured permanent deformation properties of HMA," International Journal of Pavement Engineering, vol.
With more than half of the surface area in contact, more energy transmitted rather than dissipated by the permanent deformation. On the contrary, more energy dissipated rather than transmitted with less than half of the surface area in contact.
Permanent deformations of the lower plate amounted to 87 mm, and for the upper plate- 29 mm.
This last stage is related to the pure viscous movement of the polymer chains which is not recoverable after removal of the load and often referred to as the permanent deformation. As expected, in the permanent deformation stage, increasing the temperature for all the samples increased the permanent deformation and reduced the ability of the material to recover the deformation elastically.
The yield stress [[sigma].sub.c], from which permanent deformation occurs, was defined by the previously calculated strength [3-4].
Hardness is the resistance of a material to deformation, particularly permanent deformation, indentation or scratching.

Full browser ?