deformation

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Related to permanent deformation: Plastic deformation

deformation

 [de″for-ma´shun]
1. deformity, especially an alteration in shape or structure.
2. the process of adapting in shape or form.
elastic deformation temporary elongation of tissue when a prolonged force has been applied. See also creep.
plastic deformation permanent elongation of tissue when a prolonged nondisruptive mechanical force has been applied. See also creep.

de·for·ma·tion

(dē'fōr-mā'shŭn),
1. Deviation of form from normal; specifically, an alteration in shape and/or structure of an organ or other body part; etiology may be developmental, posttraumatic, hereditary, or postsurgical, or due to pathologic conditions in adjacent structures (for example, compression by a tumor mass).
2. In rheology, the change in the physical shape of a mass by applied stress.
[L. de-formo, pp. -atus, to deform, fr. forma, form]

deformation

/de·for·ma·tion/ (de″for-ma´shun)
1. in dysmorphology, a type of structural defect characterized by the abnormal form or position of a body part, caused by a nondisruptive mechanical force.
2. the process of adapting in shape or form.

deformation

(dē′fôr-mā′shən, dĕf′ər-)
n.
1.
a. The act or process of deforming.
b. The condition of being deformed.
2. An alteration of form for the worse.
3. Physics
a. An alteration of shape, as by pressure or stress.
b. The shape that results from such an alteration.

de′for·ma′tion·al adj.
Any change in the normal size or shape of a part

deformation

Deformity Neonatology A change from the normal size or shape of a part that differentiates normally, but cannot develop fully due to in utero constraints–eg, compression, or oligohydramnios. See Defect, Dysmorphology.

de·for·ma·tion

(dē-fōr-mā'shŭn)
1. Deviation of form from normal; specifically, an alteration in shape or structure of a previously normally formed part. It occurs after organogenesis and often involves the musculoskeletal system (e.g., clubfoot).
2. Synonym(s): deformity.
3. rheology The change in the physical shape of a mass by applied stress.
[L. de-formo, pp. -atus, to deform, fr. forma, form]

de·for·ma·tion

(dē-fōr-mā'shŭn)
Deviation of form from normal; specifically, an alteration in shape and/or structure of a body part.
[L. de-formo, pp. -atus, to deform, fr. forma, form]

deformation (dē´fôrmā´shən),

n a distortion; a disfigurement.
deformation, elastic,
n the change in shape of an object under an applied load from which the object can recover or return to its original unloaded state when the load is removed.
deformation, inelastic,
n a deformation occurring when a material is stressed beyond its elastic limit.
deformation, permanent,
n a deformation occurring beyond the yield point so that the structure will not return to its original dimensions after removal of the applied force.

deformation

1. deformity, especially an alteration in shape or structure.
2. the process of adapting in shape or form.
References in periodicals archive ?
To provide a more profound insight into rheological properties, the critical temperature at which permanent deformation (rutting) occurs was determined according to the SHRP program [9].
Comparison of fundamental and simulative test methods for evaluating permanent deformation of hot-mix asphalt, Transportation Research Record 1789: 91-100.
These observations were based on Marshall Stability test, moisture susceptibility (stripping) test, resilient modulus and permanent deformation measurements.
The relationships of dynamic shear stress ratios and residual shear strains of rock fill materials from Guanmenshan and Pubugou are obtained in the consolidated drained or air exhausted cyclic loading tests in Dalian university of technology, which can be used for calculating the permanent deformation of earth and rock fill dam under seismic action.
Based on Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer (EPDM), E8T89 provides an outstanding combined level of performance across key sealing requirements, including stability in phosphate ester fluids, long-term compression set resistance, low temperature flexibility and resistance to permanent deformation.
The conflicting requirements of the different functional areas thus range from high rigidity and higher extrusion resistance (hard material) to less permanent deformation and greater elasticity (soft material).
In general, BIT must remain flexible enough to withstand sudden stress without cracking at low temperatures during winter, but it must also remain resistant to permanent deformation or viscous flow at high service temperatures.
Permanent deformation was measured with Travelling microscopic (Olympus, DF plan IX, Model 52H 100, Stereo Zoom Microscope).
This permanent deformation makes the prediction of PCC deformation due to environmental effects difficult.
PEEK is used in applications that need high loading for long period at high temperature without permanent deformation.
This reference is centered on four major themes: subduction and great earthquakes of the Aleutian Arc, the transition from strike slip to accretion and subduction of the Yakutat microplate, the Denali fault and related formations and their part in permanent deformation of the overriding plate, and regional integration and large-scale models as well as existing data to address global questions and theories.

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