perivesical

perivesical

 [per″ĭ-ves´ĭ-k'l]
next to the urinary bladder; called also juxtavesical.

per·i·cys·tic

(per'i-sis'tik),
1. Surrounding the urinary bladder.
2. Surrounding the gallbladder.
3. Surrounding a cyst.
Synonym(s): perivesical
[peri- + G. kystis, bladder]

perivesical

/peri·ves·i·cal/ (-ves´ĭ-k'l) near the urinary bladder.

per·i·cys·tic

(per'i-sis'tik)
1. Surrounding the urinary bladder.
2. Surrounding the gallbladder.
3. Surrounding a cyst.
Synonym(s): perivesical.
[peri- + G. kystis, bladder]

perivesical

around the bladder.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tissue integration of polyacrylamide hydrogel: An experimental study of periurethral, perivesical, and mammary gland tissue in the pig.
The defect length was much longer in this patient due to elevation of the bladder neck by a perivesical hematoma, which developed during the trauma and subsequently became fibrosed.
The invasive urothelial carcinomas (n = 10) invaded the lamina propria (n = 5; 50%), muscularis propria (n = 4; 40%; Figure, D), and perivesical soft tissue (n = 1; 1%).
Vesical involvement includes superficial or deep tissue layers and adjacent perivesical soft tissue (14).
Invasion into the perivesical fat may be revealed as infiltration or irregular fat-bladder wall interface.
Computed tomography (CT) showed a mass with hyperdense components that invaded perivesical fat about 10 cm diameter.
Anterior pelvic tumours that require dissection near the bladder neck are problematic because of the perivesical venous plexus that often bleeds heavily or continuously.
CT scan of abdomen and pelvis showed local infiltration of the perivesical area with small retroperitoneal adenopathy.
Then connect it in a three-corner fashion to the vaginal mucosa and the break in the perivesical tissue along the bladder.
Endoscopic techniques may involve resecting the ureteric orifice down to perivesical fat or transurethrally incising around the ureteric orifice and occluding the free orifice with an Endoloop (Ethicon, Cincinnati, OH).
20) Based on Table 1, muscularis propria infiltration is common (about 60% of the whole patient population), whereas perivesical soft tissue invasion is not frequent (about 5% of the cases, without any apparent difference between IMT and PMP).