cuffing

(redirected from perivascular cuffs)

cuffing

 [kuf´ing]
formation of a cufflike surrounding border, as of leukocytes about a blood vessel observed in certain infections.

cuff·ing

(kŭf'ing),
1. A perivascular accumulation of various leukocytes seen in infectious, inflammatory, or autoimmune diseases.
2. To surround a structure with fluid or cells, as with a cuff; in chest radiography, thickening of bronchial walls on the image.
[M.E. cuffe, mitten]

cuffing

/cuff·ing/ (kuf´ing) formation of a cufflike surrounding border, as of leukocytes about a blood vessel, observed in certain infections.

cuffing

a pathological condition in which cufflike borders of leukocytes form around small blood vessels, as in certain infections.
The sheathing of a tubular structure—e.g., a blood vessel or lymphatic—with WBCs, in response to an infection or autoimmune phenomena

cuffing

formation of a cufflike surrounding border, as of leukocytes about a blood vessel, observed in certain infections.

cuffing pneumonia
chronic enzootic pneumonia of calves in which there is lymphofollicular cuffing of small airways.
References in periodicals archive ?
Significant pathological lesions have been reported in rabies infected animals including neuronal degeneration, necrosis, perivascular cuffs surrounded by inflammatory cells and, presence of focal cell aggregates (babe's nodules) in different parts of brain (Jackson.
Histologic examination identified encephalitis, characterized by lymphohistiocytic, perivascular cuffs, in 11 (9 lambs, 1 goat kid, and 1 calf) of the 82 animals.
The lesions ranged from patchy gliosis and neuronal dropout in the ventral gray matter to extensive perivascular cuffs of chronic inflammatory cells, including histiocytes and microglia.
The affected hemisphere shows microglial nodules with or without neuronophagia, perivascular cuffs of small lymphocytes and monocytes, and gliosis.
Histopathologic examination of the rest of the brain revealed a mild meningeal infiltration with widespread lymphocytic perivascular cuffs and evidence of neurophagia and gliosis, characterized by degenerating neurons surrounded by glia cells.
Perivascular cuffs consisting of mononuclear cells were widespread in the affected areas.
Small vessels within and adjacent to these foci showed endothelial cell proliferation and perivascular cuffs of T-lymphocytes.
Lymphoplasmacytic perivascular cuffs were present throughout the brain and meninges (Figure 1).
Sections of brain showed nonspecific, nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis with perivascular cuffs of mononuclear cells and widespread focal gliosis.