periungual


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Related to periungual: periungual fibroma

per·i·un·gual

(per'ē-ŭng'gwăl),
Surrounding a nail; involving the nail folds.
[peri- + L. unguis, nail]

periungual

/peri·un·gual/ (-ung´gw'l) around the nail.

periungual

[per′i·ung′gwəl]
Etymology: Gk, peri + L, unguis, nail
pertaining to the area around the fingernails or the toenails.

periungual

(pĕr″ē-ŭng′gwăl) [″ + L. unguis, nail]
Around a nail.
References in periodicals archive ?
Our patient was a 32-year-old male, non-hypertensive, non-diabetic, who fulfilled five major criteria (facial angiofibromas, periungual fibromas, ash leaf spots, cortical dysplasia, subependymal nodules (SEN), renal angiomyolipomas) of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) as per diagnostic criteria of the 2012 International Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Consensus Conference (Box 1).
Using a periungual puncture site, pain was not referred by any subject, although a bothersome sensation was noted by some.
3) Characteristic skin manifestations include heliotrope rash, periungual telangiectasia, edema, and facial erythema, with the hallmark being Gottron's papules--scaling, erythematous eruptions over the knuckles and other extensor surfaces.
In patients with tuberous sclerosis complex, hypomelanotic macules and fibrous plaques occur earlier compared to typical facial angiofibromas or periungual fibromas (11).
Periungual fibroma (Koenen tumors) as isolated sign of tuberous sclerosis complex with tuberous sclerosis complex 1 germline mutation.
Physical examination showed less induration of the skin, resolution of the periungual erythema, and increased range of movement of the fingers.
Periungual and subungual warts caused by high-risk HPV subtypes pose a risk for malignant transformation [1].
Onychomycosis is defined as a fungal infection of the nail unit (Figure 1): the nail plate, nail bed, and periungual tissue.
Subaguda: descamacion periungual en los dedos de las manos, en los dedos de los pies en las semanas 2 y 3 de la enfermedad
Features suggesting malignancy include older age, male gender, rapid onset of skin or muscle symptoms, skin necrosis, and periungual erythema.
These lesions are painless, slow growing, present 3 months to 30 years before resection, and involve the subungual or periungual region of the fingers and toes.