periphrastic

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periphrastic

(pĕr″ĭ-frăs′tĭk) [Gr. periphrastikos]
Pert. to the use of superfluous words in expressing a thought, as in the writings and speech of some schizophrenics.
References in periodicals archive ?
The comparator is another functional category, this time adjective-related, which may be expressed periphrastically (more beautiful, less beautiful) or morphologically (nicer).
The progressives (focalized and durative) are expressed periphrastically, i.e.
In his attempt to counter nineteenth-century realism and naturalism, Unamuno fabricates the nivola, which depicts reality indirectly, periphrastically. Characters such as Augusto Perez resemble ideological abstractions more than recognizable, physical types.
Balinese, for example, exhibits all three types of middle construction, allowing some situation types to be expressed either morphologically or periphrastically, as shown in Table 1.
As a functional category, {N} can also be expressed periphrastically, as a quantifier, for example, or as in a scent--though I am not concerned at this point with the internal structure of these nominal phrases: we return to them in [section] 4.
The Wish, being the Tenth Satyr of Juvenal, periphrastically rendered ...
In Bafia, the diminutive is constructed periphrastically: the noun to be diminutivized is preceded by the word man, 'child' (plural: bon), which behaves as a fully lexical noun and triggers agreement.
The reason that Stassen (1997) introduces this restrictive PAST CONDITION into the identification of tensed languages is that the concept of future tense is problematic and "the future does not belong to the same grammatical category as the present and past" (Bybee 1985: 157) since future is more often found to be expressed periphrastically than other tenses, and furthermore, the form of future is less often used obligatorily than the past-tense form if a language has a future form (Stassen 1997: 355).