periphrastic

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periphrastic

(pĕr″ĭ-frăs′tĭk) [Gr. periphrastikos]
Pert. to the use of superfluous words in expressing a thought, as in the writings and speech of some schizophrenics.
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In a previous study, Gonzalez-Rivera (2009) documents the same pattern in the diachrony of Spanish: from the 13 (th) to the 15th centuries the gerund periphrasis with aorist aspect was associated with the auxiliary ir in some 96.4% of cases.
(a) Can the different types of adjectival periphrasis (i.e.
As discussed in the first paragraph of this section, there is a group of English constructions [V + English gerund] that corresponds to the sequence [Verbal Periphrasis with infinitive] in Spanish.
--non-committal --need for some teaching --missing section Defects of Style --puerility--learned trifling, insipid --parenthyrsus--uncalled for display of emotion --more in speaking than writing --comes from a craze for novelty Needed for the Sublime --lofty thought and lofty words --submission to great predecessors Figures of Speech --amplification --rhetorical treatment of the commonplace --images--writer has clear picture and gives it to readers --no arbitrary devices --artificial ring in figures--harmful e.g., from Demosthenes and others --apostrophe--emotional appeal Periphrasis --round about way of saying things e.g., death = destined path --warned that it could fall flat --Moliere satirized this.
In an essay published in 1999, "Language, Suffering, and Silence," Hill feels awkwardly constrained as he tries to find the right way of introducing Hopkins: Why, for instance, did I feel constrained to use the awkward periphrasis "Catholic priest who was also a poet" rather than the succinct "priest and poet" or even "priest-poet"?
In the case of paradigmatic periphrasis entire word-classes lack certain combinations of inflectional categories (Haspelmath 2002: 143).
The phrase he who is to be seen "as a substitute for the first person singular:' It reminds me of my son, aged five, who announced on a wobbly train in France, "What does a boy do when a boy feels sick?" He was rushed to the toilet of course, to be sick, but the periphrasis speaks volumes about how a boy of that age feels about his dignity.
An example of a case in which grammatical meaning has been attributed to complex constructions is the case of periphrasis (Ackermann and Webelhuth 1998, Booij (ms.), Blevins (ms.), Lee (2007)), which is also a much-studied example of grammaticalization.
The hitting coach is shadowing me like an intern so I try to get the dad to save face in my most eloquent periphrasis but my circumlocution runs into translation difficulties.
Ibn Gabirol's last half-verse is, essentially, a periphrasis of "as long as I live." But the word haj (live, or living) occurs in the periphrasis too.