periphrastic

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periphrastic

(pĕr″ĭ-frăs′tĭk) [Gr. periphrastikos]
Pert. to the use of superfluous words in expressing a thought, as in the writings and speech of some schizophrenics.
References in periodicals archive ?
In a previous study, Gonzalez-Rivera (2009) documents the same pattern in the diachrony of Spanish: from the 13 (th) to the 15th centuries the gerund periphrasis with aorist aspect was associated with the auxiliary ir in some 96.4% of cases.
(a) Can the different types of adjectival periphrasis (i.e.
As discussed in the first paragraph of this section, there is a group of English constructions [V + English gerund] that corresponds to the sequence [Verbal Periphrasis with infinitive] in Spanish.
--non-committal --need for some teaching --missing section Defects of Style --puerility--learned trifling, insipid --parenthyrsus--uncalled for display of emotion --more in speaking than writing --comes from a craze for novelty Needed for the Sublime --lofty thought and lofty words --submission to great predecessors Figures of Speech --amplification --rhetorical treatment of the commonplace --images--writer has clear picture and gives it to readers --no arbitrary devices --artificial ring in figures--harmful e.g., from Demosthenes and others --apostrophe--emotional appeal Periphrasis --round about way of saying things e.g., death = destined path --warned that it could fall flat --Moliere satirized this.
In an essay published in 1999, "Language, Suffering, and Silence," Hill feels awkwardly constrained as he tries to find the right way of introducing Hopkins: Why, for instance, did I feel constrained to use the awkward periphrasis "Catholic priest who was also a poet" rather than the succinct "priest and poet" or even "priest-poet"?
In the case of paradigmatic periphrasis entire word-classes lack certain combinations of inflectional categories (Haspelmath 2002: 143).
From a functional grammar standpoint, as proposed by Dik (1997), this verbal periphrasis is a predicative operator [[pi].sub.1] which works upon the nuclear predicate by denoting its internal dynamics.
The phrase he who is to be seen "as a substitute for the first person singular:' It reminds me of my son, aged five, who announced on a wobbly train in France, "What does a boy do when a boy feels sick?" He was rushed to the toilet of course, to be sick, but the periphrasis speaks volumes about how a boy of that age feels about his dignity.
An example of a case in which grammatical meaning has been attributed to complex constructions is the case of periphrasis (Ackermann and Webelhuth 1998, Booij (ms.), Blevins (ms.), Lee (2007)), which is also a much-studied example of grammaticalization.
The hitting coach is shadowing me like an intern so I try to get the dad to save face in my most eloquent periphrasis but my circumlocution runs into translation difficulties.
Ibn Gabirol's last half-verse is, essentially, a periphrasis of "as long as I live." But the word haj (live, or living) occurs in the periphrasis too.
This article shows that the most preferencial and functional attenuation form of orders and requests in the colloquial Spanish of the former Obando province in South West Colombia is the periphrasis "dar" (in simple present or future) + gerund.