peripheral vestibular disorder

peripheral vestibular disorder

Neurology A hallucination of movement, either subjective or objective History Duration of an attack–eg, hrs v. days, frequency daily v. monthly, effect of head movement–eg, better, no effect, induced change position or posture, associated aural Sx–eg, hearing loss and tinnitus, concomitant or prior ear disease and/or ear surgery
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Psychiatric morbidity in patients with peripheral vestibular disorder: a clinical and neuro-otological study.
Keywords: Caloric test, ocular VEMP, video head impulse test, peripheral vestibular disorder, vestibular hypofunction, canal paralysis
Posterior fossa strokes may rarely cause isolated (central) vertigo, and infarction of the labyrinth may even more rarely mimic a peripheral vestibular disorder with vertigo and deafness (discussed below).
Of this group, 121 patients (73.8%) had a peripheral vestibular disorder and 43 (26.2%) had a central vestibular disorder.
(ii) 18 patients with peripheral vestibular disorder without anxiety symptoms--10 had acute peripheral vestibular dysfunction and 8 had had complaints of dizziness or imbalance for more than 1 year.
* Peripheral vestibular disorder, a disturbance in the labyrinth.
Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) is considered to be the most common peripheral vestibular disorder (3).
A diagnosis of "unknown peripheral vestibular disorder" was made if the patient's history or electronystagmographic findings indicated a peripheral cause but did not meet the criteria for one of the known peripheral diseases.
The sinusoidal vertical-axis rotation test revealed a borderline low gain at 0.5 Hz, abnormal symmetry to the right at three frequencies, and phases consistent with a peripheral vestibular disorder (figure 2).
The sinusoidal vertical-axis rotation test revealed normal gains and a lag or borderline lag at three frequencies--findings that are consistent with a peripheral vestibular disorder. Symmetry was normal and consistent with the patient's lack of vestibular symptoms.
The previous abnormal symmetry had disappeared, indicating a complete central vestibular compensation of a peripheral vestibular disorder. This finding was consistent with his vestibular symptoms.
The simultaneous binaural bithermal test was not corrected for the preexisting nystagmus, and it elicited a type 2 response--that is, a reduced vestibular response left that was consistent with a left peripheral vestibular disorder. This was achieved by a reversal of the right-beating nystagmus with the simultaneous cool (30[degrees]C) stimulus.
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