periodontitis


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periodontitis

 [per″e-o-don-ti´tis]
inflammation of the periodontium, usually caused by specific pathologic bacteria that grow in the spaces between the gum and lower part of the tooth crown, and the host response to inflammation. If it continues unchecked the infection will spread to the bone in which the teeth are rooted. The bone then resorbs and the teeth slowly become detached from their supporting tissues. Periodontitis is the major cause of tooth loss after the age of 35. It can be prevented or controlled by good dental hygiene such as proper brushing and interdental cleaning, or by nonsurgical or surgical periodontal therapy. It is treated with local cleansing and débridement of the area, establishment of drainage for exudate, and use of antimicrobial agents. Antibiotic drugs and host modulating therapy are indicated if the symptoms are severe and unresponsive to other treatments. Extraction of the affected teeth may be necessary if the lesion is advanced.

per·i·o·don·ti·tis

(per'ē-ō-don-tī'tis),
1. Inflammation of the periodontium.
2. A chronic inflammatory disease of the periodontium occurring in response to bacterial plaque on the adjacent teeth; characterized by gingivitis, destruction of the alveolar bone and periodontal ligament, apical migration of the epithelial attachment resulting in the formation of periodontal pockets, and ultimately loosening and exfoliation of the teeth.
[periodontium + G. -itis, inflammation]

periodontitis

Gum disease, pyorrhea gum disease Dentistry A condition caused by progression of gingivitis, with inflammation and infection of tooth ligaments and bones supporting teeth. See Juvenile periodontitis.

per·i·o·don·ti·tis

(perē-ō-don-tītis)
1. Inflammation of the periodontium.
2. A chronic inflammatory disease of the periodontium occurring in response to bacterial plaque on the adjacent teeth; characterized by gingivitis, destruction of the alveolar bone and periodontal ligament, apical migration of the epithelial attachment resulting in the formation of periodontal pockets, and, ultimately, loosening and exfoliation of the teeth.
[periodontium + G. -itis, inflammation]

periodontitis

Inflammation of the PERIODONTIUM. This may be centred mainly around the root of the tooth (apical periodontitis) or may be a persistent (chronic) condition affecting the whole periodontium as a complication of severe gum inflammation (gingivitis). Treatment of apical periodontitis is by drilling to drain any pus present and filling. Chronic periodontitis requires scrupulous attention to tooth hygiene, scaling, cleaning and sometimes removal of excessive gum tissue.

Periodontitis

A gum disease that destroys the structures supporting the teeth, including bone.
Mentioned in: Oral Hygiene, Toothache

per·i·o·don·ti·tis

(perē-ō-don-tītis)
Inflammatory disease of periodontium occurring in response to bacterial plaque on adjacent teeth; characterized by gingivitis, destruction of alveolar bone and periodontal ligament, apical migration of the epithelial attachment resulting in formation of periodontal pockets, and ultimately loosening and exfoliation of teeth.
[periodontium + G. -itis, inflammation]
References in periodicals archive ?
Seventy-five subjects aged 18-40 years, having periodontitis were recruited from dental OPD.
Se realizo un estudio prospectivo y experimental, llevado a cabo en la Facultad de Odontologia de la Universidad Central de Venezuela, en el Postgrado de Periodoncia, en pacientes diagnosticados con periodontitis cronica o agresiva, siguiendo los criterios establecidos en 1999 por la Academia Americana de Periodontologia (12).
There are two types of IL-1 ([alpha] and [beta]2), and IL-1[beta] plays a key role in the process of bone destruction in periodontitis. (20) In animals with experimental periodontitis, blocking IL-1 receptors can significantly reduce the aggregation of inflammatory cells and formation of osteoclasts, which ultimately reduces the loss of alveolar bone.
Sixteen patients with chronic apical periodontitis (six men and ten women; age range 41-69 years, mean age=58.42[+ or -]2.25 years) participated in the study.
"Low-grade systemic inflammation that is typical of periodontitis might explain this finding because it has been regarded as the mechanism underlying the association of periodontitis with several cardiovascular risk factors and diseases."
A total of 13 subjects were recruited from the Department of Periodontics, Kamineni Institute of Dental Sciences, with a diagnosis of chronic generalized periodontitis.
The second major feature of PLS is severe periodontitis, which starts at the age of 3 or 4 years.1,4 Aggressive periodontitis begins with the primary dentition leading to premature loss of deciduous teeth by the age of 6 years.
The presentation concluded with a practical 4-step approach for implementing the new classification for periodontitis: (1)
Se realizo una busqueda sistematica de literatura para responder la siguiente pregunta: ?Cuales son los factores de riesgos modificables e inmodificables mas comunmente asociados a la periodontitis cronica?
His intra oral examination revealed generalized moderate plaque and calculus deposits and typical features of chronic periodontitis. There were more than 6mm of periodontal pocket depths in all four quadrants of the dentition.
Aside from poor oral hygiene, periodontitis may also be caused by other factors such as:
Fourteen participants (5 healthy, 4 gingivitis, 5 periodontitis) were consented and enrolled in this blinded, ex vivo study.