periodontal

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periodontal

 [per″e-o-don´t'l]
around a tooth; pertaining to the periodontium.
periodontal disease any disease of the periodontium, such as periodontitis or gingivitis. Sometimes it is a manifestation of a systemic disease.

per·i·o·don·tal

(per'ē-ō-don'tăl),
Around a tooth.
[peri- + G. odous, tooth]

periodontal

(pĕr′ē-ə-dŏn′tl)
adj.
1. Surrounding or encasing a tooth: a periodontal ligament.
2. Relating to or affecting tissue and structures surrounding and supporting the teeth.

per′i·o·don′tal·ly adv.

per·i·o·don·tal

(perē-ō-dontăl )
Around a tooth.
[peri- + G. odous, tooth]

Periodontal

Pertaining to the gums.
Mentioned in: Oral Hygiene

per·i·o·don·tal

(perē-ō-dontăl )
Around a tooth.
Synonym(s): paradental, pericemental, peridental.
[peri- + G. odous, tooth]
References in periodicals archive ?
Periodontal attachment loss in independently living older adults in Ontario, Canada.
A community study on relationship between stress, coping, affective dispositions and periodontal attachment loss. Community Dent Oral Epidemiol.2006;4: 252-66
[22] However, few studies have assessed the effect of local plaque-retaining factors in the occurrence of periodontal attachment loss in young age cohorts.
Age Gender N % % % (years) target edentulism population 12 to 19 Male 21 53.8 0 Female 18 46.2 78 0 20-29 Male 31 50 0 Female 31 50 74 0 Total 101 100 76 0 Age Gender mean number of AgP Prevalence (years) teeth present % N [95% CI] 12 to 19 Male 25.7 [24.4;27.0] 9.5 2 Female 26.3 [25.5;27.2] 11.1 2 20-29 Male 24.6 [23.8;25.5] 12.9 4 Female 24.8 [23.4;26.2] 6.5 2 Total 25.2 [24.6;25.8] 9.9 10 Table 2--Prevalence (%) and extent of periodontal attachment loss and probing depth [greater than or equal to] 4 mm, [greater than or equal to] 5 mm, and [greater than or equal to] 6 mm, according to age and gender.
While many researchers have attempted to identify risk factors that influence that natural history of progressive periodontal attachment loss and tooth loss, few studies have examined the impact of residual pockets following active treatment on meaningful outcomes.
* Following active periodontal treatment, the presence of residual periodontal pockets (both bleeding and non-bleeding) significantly increases the odds for future periodontal attachment loss and tooth loss.
Dufour LA, Bissell HS: Periodontal attachment loss induced by mechanical subgingival instrumentation in shallow sulci.
The studies, in subjects with varying degrees of periodontitis, ranged in length from six months to five years, and in part assessed periodontal attachment loss in sites <4.0 mm, that resulted from various treatments.
Radiographic analysis of alveolar bone height changes may still allow more sensitive evaluation of periodontal attachment loss compared to changes in probing attachment loss.