perineometer

perineometer

 [per″in-e-om´ĕ-ter]
a device inserted into the vagina to measure the strength of muscular contractions when kegel exercises are performed. It is also frequently used to monitor the patient's progress in bladder reeducation programs.

per·i·ne·om·e·ter

(per'i-nē-om'ĕ-tĕr),
Instrument used to measure the strength of voluntary muscle contractions of the perineum.
[perineo- + G. metron, measure]

perineometer

(per?i-ne-om'e-ter) [Gr. perinaion, perineum, + metron, measure]
An apparatus for measuring the pressure or force that is produced in the vagina when the pubococcygeus and levator ani muscles are contracted voluntarily.
See: Kegel exercise

perineometer (peˈ·rē·nēˈ·ō·mēˑ· ter),

n in biofeedback therapy, an instrument that provides a measurement of the strength of contractions produced by the pelvic floor and anal sphincter muscles.
References in periodicals archive ?
The PFM contraction pressure was recorded using a Peritron[R] perineometer (Cardio Design Australia, range from 0 to 300 cm[H.
A Peritron precision perineometer 9300AV (Cardio Design Pty Ltd, Oakleigh, Victoria, Australia) perineometer and 3010 (Cardio Design Pty Ltd, Oakleigh, Victoria, Australia) type anal sensor were used.
In 1948, Kegel recommended the use of pelvic floor muscle exercises along with a pneumatic device called a perineometer to measure by way of biofeedback the strength of pelvic floor muscle contractions (Khan & Rizvi, 2005).
The patient used a perineometer to assist with visualizing the perineal muscle contraction and initially exercised 20 minutes 3 times a day.
His kegel perineometer allowed women to feel, measure and develop greater control of their pelvic floor muscles.
Since there was no perineometer in the department to objectively determine the strength of the pelvic floor muscles, the prolapse was subjectively rated.
The mean perineal muscle tone, measured by a perineometer, fell from about 50 cm [H.
Gordon and Logue,(143) using a perineometer to measure perineal muscle function 1 year after delivery, found a strong correlation between muscle function and regular exercise, with no relationship between the degree of perineal trauma and subsequent muscle function.
Arnold Kegel developed the first biofeedback device, the perineometer, which was a pressure manometric sensor inserted into the vagina.
1984), 19 females were educated in either pelvic floor exercises alone or by using biofeedback with a perineometer.