perinatology

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perinatology

 [per″i-na-tol´o-je]
the branch of medicine (obstetrics and pediatrics) dealing with the fetus and infant during the perinatal period.

per·i·na·tol·o·gy

(per'i-nā-tol'ŏ-jē),
A subspeciality of obstetrics concerned with care of the mother and fetus during pregnancy, labor, and delivery, particularly when the mother or fetus is at a high risk for complications.
Synonym(s): perinatal medicine

perinatology

/peri·na·tol·o·gy/ (-na-tol´ah-je) the branch of medicine (obstetrics and pediatrics) dealing with the fetus and infant during the perinatal period.

perinatology

(pĕr′ə-nā-tŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The medical specialty concerned with the care of the mother, fetus, and infant during the perinatal period.

perinatology

[-nātol′əgē]
Etymology: Gk, peri + L, natus, birth; Gk, logos, science
a branch of medicine concerned with the study of the anatomical and physiological characteristics of mothers and their unborn and newborns, with diagnosis and treatment of disorders occurring in them during pregnancy, childbirth, and the puerperium. perinatologic, perinatological, adj.

per·i·na·tol·o·gy

(per'i-nā-tol'ŏ-jē)
A subspecialty of obstetrics concerned with care of the mother and fetus during pregnancy, labor, and delivery, particularly when one or both is at high risk of complications.
Synonym(s): perinatal medicine.

perinatology

The study of the care of the pregnant woman, the developing fetus and the new-born baby, and especially of those cases in which risk is anticipated from conditions known to endanger the life or health of the fetus or mother.

perinatology

the branch of veterinary medicine (obstetrics and pediatrics) dealing with the fetus and the newborn during the perinatal period.
References in periodicals archive ?
One of the perinatologists came in and, using the ultrasound machine, captured images of the area in question.
Then, recognizing a growing local need for this important medical subspecialty, Sacred Heart Medical Center recruited and hired a perinatologist to serve the Eugene-Springfield area.
Perinatologists may plan and coordinate the delivery of mothers with medical problems, such as diabetes.
However, 4% of the patients cared for by OBs were also referred (26 cases), and in 18%, consults were sought, usually with a perinatologist.
Conclusion: The IRS concluded that Hospital D did not jeopardize its tax-exempt status in this recruitment effort because objective evidence demonstrated a need for four perinatologists to provide coverage for the hospital's neonatal intensive care unit so that the hospital could promote the health of the community it serves, the provision of a reasonable private practice income guarantee as a recruitment incentive that is conditioned on the physician's obtaining medical staff privileges and providing coverage for the neonatal care unit is reasonably related to accomplishment of the charitable purposes of the hospital, and the community benefit provided by recruitment of the perinatologist outweighed any private benefit to the physician.
At a time when a women's hospital was a new idea, Saddleback Memorial's facility was the first hospital in the area to have a Level 3 neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), and to have perinatologists and anesthesiologists available 24 hours a day for mothers who were giving birth.
Half work as perinatology extenders doing some or most of their deliveries and half use perinatologists only as a consultant, like a private practitioner would.
The data available are not consistently good and there are still many differences of opinion between endocrinologists and perinatologists about how to interpret the data and best manage pregnant women," Dr.
This reference is for a broad audience including medical geneticists, genetic counselors, pediatricians, neonatologists, pediatricians, perinatologists, obstetricians, neurologists, pathologists, and any physicians and health care professionals caring for handicapped children.
The perinatologists can provide backup for the nonobstetricians who provide prenatal care as well as backup for the midwives.
The AIDS epidemic brought obstetricians, pediatricians, perinatologists, and infectious disease specialists closer together and focused attention on the link between a woman's health and that of her child.