perigastric


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Related to perigastric: epigastric

perigastric

 [per″ĭ-gas´trik]
around the stomach; pertaining to the peritoneal coat of the stomach.

per·i·gas·tric

(per'i-gas'trik),
Surrounding the stomach.
[peri- + G. gastēr, belly, stomach]

perigastric

(pĕr″ĭ-găs′trĭk) [″ + gaster, belly]
Around the stomach.

perigastric

around the stomach; pertaining to the peritoneal coat of the stomach.
References in periodicals archive ?
A follow-up abdominal CT scan after 8 weeks from admission revealed the decreased but still remaining large amount of necrotic collections (Figure 1(c)) and SVT with engorgement of perigastric veins (Figure 1(d)).
Submucosal, intramural, and perigastric serpentine vascular structures are well demonstrated on CT (Figure 11), best performed in the portal venous phase.
During the study period, 151 patients underwent LAGB using the perigastric technique at the hospital, but only 82 of these patients were available for a follow-up evaluation in 2009.
A possible mechanism of primary hydatid disesase of the chest wall may be for the embryo to pass through the duodenal wall into either the portal vein or the periduodenal and perigastric lymphatics, which connect to the thoraco-mediastinal lymphatics and the thoracic duct.
In 2002, the perigastric technique was replaced by the pars flaccida approach.
Typically, the muscular layer of the GI tract is thickened greatly and eosinophilic inflammation is present extending through the serosa into the perigastric or mesenteric fat; the GI mucosa is typically spared [2,3,5,6].
Five (2%) serious, procedure-related adverse events occurred: two perigastric inflammatory fluid collections (adjacent to the fundus), one self-limited extragastric hemorrhage, one pulmonary embolism 72 h after the procedure, and one pneumoperitoneum/pneumothorax requiring chest tube placement.
1] Metastasis in perigastric lymph node(s) within 3 cm of edge of primary tumour.
In addition, there were a few enlarged, firm lymph nodes in the perigastric adipose tissue.
He had lymphadenopathy of the supraclavicular, paratracheal, subcarinal, perihilar, internal mammary, perigastric, retroperitoneal, iliac, and inguinal lymph nodes and multiple splenic lesions (Figure1, panel A; online Appendix Table).
In 2002 the perigastric technique was replaced by the pars flaccida approach.