pericranial


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per·i·cra·ni·al

(per'i-krā'nē-ăl),
Relating to the pericranium; surrounding the skull.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

pericranial

(pĕr″ĭ-krā′nē-ăl) [″ + kranion, skull]
Pert. to the periosteum of the skull.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
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References in periodicals archive ?
This could explain the differences in the activation of the frontal pericranial regions between specific and categoric memories, due to the cognitive effort performed by the subject, which is assumed to be higher in the access to specific memories.
The scalp was incisioned in the midline and the pericranial muscles and fascia were retracted laterally.
(Bjorne & Agerberg, 1996; Bjorne et al., 1998) expressed that the hearing damage and auditive loss frequently associated with tinnitus is strongly related to emotional tension such as headaches, cervical and pericranial muscular tension, as well as dreaming disorders that produce suboccipital muscular tension and vertigo experience.
In that trial, 123 patients with a history of two to eight moderate to severe migraines per month received a single injection of 25 U or 75 U of Botox administered into multiple sites in the pericranial muscles.
Palpate the temporal arteries and pericranial muscles and examine the eyes.
This model speculates that a form of "spreading depression" in the primary migraine reflects a central neuronal disorder.[21] The VSM model hypothesizes that migraine headache may be determined by the sum of nociception from cephalic arteries and pericranial myofascial tissues.[42]
* Trigeminal Neuralgia: Botox 25-75 U injected into pericranial muscles relieves headache by relaxing the over active muscles and decreases pain associated with inflammation of the trigeminal nerve of the head and face can.
Various materials--including hydroxyapatite cement, autologous fat, muscle, bone, pericranial flaps, bioactive glass S53P4, lyophilised allogenic cartilage, and Proplast--have been used to obliterate the frontal sinus.
Patients with a similar presentation as reported in this case, with myofascial tender points, and without any positive clinical signs that are valid and reliable, should be classified under the tension-type headache with associated pericranial tenderness, according to the new classification.
Chronic tension-type headache: amitriptyline reduces clinical headache-duration and experimental pain sensitivity but does not alter pericranial muscle activity readings.
It has been suggested that pain after intracranial surgery is not related to intraoperative manipulation and incision of the brain itself but that the major source of pain following craniotomy is from the skin incision and reflection of muscles during the operation.[20] This suggestion was supported by one 1996 Italian study which found that the majority of pain after intracranial surgery is predominately superficial, possibly involving pericranial muscles and soft tissues,[10] Pain after intracranial surgery may also be related to the position of the head during the surgical procedure.
Dural defects are repaired with watertight sutures or with pericranial fascia.