perfuse

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per·fuse

(per-fyŭs'),
To force blood or other fluid to flow from the artery through the vascular bed of a tissue or to flow through the lumen of a hollow structure (for example, an isolated renal tubule). Compare: perifuse, superfuse.
[L. perfusio, fr. per- + fusio, a pouring]

per·fuse

(pĕr-fyūz')
To force blood or other fluid to flow from an artery through the vascular bed of a tissue or to flow through the lumen of a hollow structure (e.g., an isolated renal tubule).
[L. perfusio, fr. per- + fusio, a pouring]

perfuse

(pĕr-fūz′) [L. perfundere, to moisten (all over)]
To force or instill (fluids) into an organ or a vessel.
References in periodicals archive ?
Compared with continuous mechanical chest compression-assisted PCI, ECMO seems to provide more effective circulatory support than continuous mechanical chest compressions with LUCAS device in cardiac arrest, but implantation of the ECMO usually takes longer and often requires extra staff with special skills, such as a cardiovascular surgeon and a perfusionist.
Methods: The cross-sectional study was conducted from March to April 2012 comprising a randomly selected group of 52 perfusionists from public and private healthcare institutions in Istanbul.
6 percent) of perfusionists use of a cell phone during the performance of cardiopul-monary bypass (CPB).
A cardiac catheter lab was created, as was a new operating theatre, and areas for perfusionists within theatre.
The staff targeted for this information included critical care, thoracic and lung transplant physicians, perfusionists, MSICU nurses, and respiratory therapists.
CANSECT membership included both dialysis nurses and technicians and heart-lung perfusionists.
Presented as a reference for clinical perfusionists, cardiac surgeons, anesthesiologists and others who are involved with cardiopulmonary bypass surgery, this text covers the vital decision-making processes that occur during these surgical techniques.
Mr Kendall praised his team of nurses, anaesthetists, perfusionists who run heart lung machines and physiotherapists for their hard work.
Mr Calvert said he expected that cardiac surgeons, anaesthetists, nursing staff and perfusionists would work with mediators brought in to restore discord in a positive and constructive way.
Most commonly, perfusionists operate a heart-lung machine to keep a patient alive during open heart surgery.
The hospital received in excess of 116 written complaints from Seton's staff about abusive, hypercritical, and hostile attitude and behavior toward nursing staff, anesthesiologists, and perfusionists.
At each site, we conducted an average of ten interviews, including one to three people in each of the four OR team roles: surgeons, anesthesiologists, OR nurses, and perfusionists.