perfuse

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per·fuse

(per-fyŭs'),
To force blood or other fluid to flow from the artery through the vascular bed of a tissue or to flow through the lumen of a hollow structure (for example, an isolated renal tubule). Compare: perifuse, superfuse.
[L. perfusio, fr. per- + fusio, a pouring]

per·fuse

(pĕr-fyūz')
To force blood or other fluid to flow from an artery through the vascular bed of a tissue or to flow through the lumen of a hollow structure (e.g., an isolated renal tubule).
[L. perfusio, fr. per- + fusio, a pouring]

perfuse

(pĕr-fūz′) [L. perfundere, to moisten (all over)]
To force or instill (fluids) into an organ or a vessel.
References in periodicals archive ?
Due to limited literature on the Novalung[R] iLA, our primary sources for information were the visiting physician from Germany, the lung transplant physicians, and the perfusionists.
And so, in 1975 at the Toronto Symposium, the heart-lung perfusionists voted to join with the Canadian Cardiovascular Society.
Perfusionists have to be brave and believe in themselves and their training.
1-6] However, because an expensive machine and a dedicated perfusionist are required, continuous-flow blood salvage is inaccessable to many mid-sized and small hospitals.
I was on the board of directors when we effected a name change from Canadian Society of Dialysis Perfusionists (CSDP) to Canadian Association of Nephrology Nurses and Technicians (CANNT) to reflect more accurately who we were and what we did.
Focusing first on the cardiovascular operating room (CVOR), Jones worked with all the stakeholders--the STAT lab, perfusionists, IT, physicians--to map the current process at Geisinger Medical Center, a 403-bed hospital in Danville.
Perfusionists operate the heart-lung machines that pump life-giving blood during surgery.
ECMO requires a high-functioning, multidisciplinary team, including, ECMO specialists at the patient's bedside, neonatologists, intensivists, surgeons, perfusionists, nurses, respiratory therapists, cardiologists and neuro-radiologists.
Pediatric cardiologists, heart surgeons, anesthesiologists, nurses and perfusionists from nearly every state and over 20 countries will discuss new treatments for children in heart failure, neurodevelopment in children who have congenital heart disease, innovation and challenges in the management of children with single ventricle, and adult congenital heart disease.
It involves a whole team of doctors: perfusionists, anesthesiologists, resuscitators, pediatric cardiologists, neonatologists, and many others.
Figures One, Two, & Three, reprinted from Dialtec, The official newsletter of the Canadian Society of Dialysis Perfusionists, (1979 Nov--Dec), pages 1-2.
perfusionists or physician assistants) notify the blood bank.