perfusion-weighted imaging


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perfusion-weighted imaging

Imaging An MRI that provides metabolic and hemodynamic data of the brain in the first few hrs post-stroke, based on the movement of perfused contrast material. See Magnetic resonance imaging. Cf Diffusion-weighted imaging.
References in periodicals archive ?
Vossough et al., "Differentiation between oligodendroglioma genotypes using dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion-weighted imaging and proton MR spectroscopy" American Journal of Neuroradiology, vol.
Combined spin-and gradient-echo perfusion-weighted imaging. Magn Reson Med.
Magnetic resonance imaging showed that patients on triple therapy had significantly smaller stroke lesions, with a mean volume based on perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) of 49.1 cc, compared with 74.6 cc with single therapy and 78.5 cc with dual therapy.
Magnetic resonance imaging showed that patients who received triple therapy had significantly smaller stroke lesions, with a mean volume based on perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) of 49.1 cc, vs.
MRI, which includes perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), will replace computed tomography (CT) because of its heightened sensitivity.
Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is the most sensitive MRI technique by which to identify the acute ischemic core.[sup][1] When used together, perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) and DWI can identify brain tissue with hypoperfusion, which is defined as "ischemic penumbra," from normal diffusion.[sup][2] The role of perfusion neuroimaging in the management of AIS is to confirm the presence of reduced regional blood flow and contribute to the identification of the ischemic penumbra that might be salvaged by thrombolytic and/or endovascular recanalization therapy.[sup][3]
Enrolled patients underwent an MRI, with diffusion-weighted and perfusion-weighted imaging sequences.
The advent of new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques such as diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and perfusion MRI (perfusion-weighted imaging [PWI]) in the early 1990s added a new dimension to diagnostic imaging in stroke.
Perfusion-weighted imaging allows the measurement of capillary perfusion of the brain.
Perfusion-weighted imaging, a companion magnetic resonance technique, images actual blood flow through brain vasculature.
The combination of diffusion-weighted imaging and perfusion-weighted imaging provides a way to distinguish between the area of hypoperfusion as measured by perfusion-weighted imaging and actual infarct size shown in diffusion-weighted imaging.
[sup][1] Magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) is a technique to quantitatively evaluate tumor microenvironments by measuring cerebral blood volume (CBV).