perfusion


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perfusion

 [per-fu´zhun]
1. the act of pouring through or over; especially the passage of a fluid through the vessels of a specific organ.
2. a liquid poured through or over an organ or tissue.
tissue perfusion the circulation of blood through the vascular bed of tissue.
ineffective tissue perfusion (specify type) (renal, cerebral, cardiopulmonary, gastrointestinal, peripheral) a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a state in which an individual has a decrease in oxygen resulting in failure to nourish the tissues at the capillary level.

per·fu·sion

(per-fyū'zhŭn),
1. The act of perfusing.
2. The flow of blood or other perfusate per unit volume of tissue, as in ventilation:perfusion ratio.

perfusion

(pər-fyo͞o′zhən)
n.
1. The act or an instance of perfusing.
2. The injection of fluid into a blood vessel in order to reach an organ or tissues, usually to supply nutrients and oxygen.

perfusion

Bathing an organ or tissue with a fluid. See Arterial perfusion, Hyperthermic perfusion, Isolated hepatic perfusion, Limb perfusion, Myocardial perfusion Oncology A technique used for a melanoma of an arm or leg; circulation to and from the limb is stopped with a tourniquet; chemotherapy is put directly into the circulation to ↑ regional drug dose Transplantation The intravascular irrigation of an isolated organ with blood, plasma or physiologic substance, to either studying its metabolism or physiology under 'normal' conditions or for maintaining the organ as 'fresh' as possible, while transporting donated organs to recipients. See Slush preparation.

per·fu·sion

(pĕr-fyū'zhŭn)
1. The act of perfusing.
2. The flow of blood or other perfusate per unit volume of tissue, as in ventilation:perfusion ratio.

perfusion

1. The passage of blood or other fluids through the body.
2. The effectiveness with which a part, such as the brain, is supplied with blood.

perfusion

the passage of a liquid through an organ or tissue.

Perfusion

The passage of fluid (such as blood) through a specific organ or area of the body (such as the heart).
Mentioned in: Shock, Thallium Heart Scan

per·fu·sion

(pĕr-fyū'zhŭn)
Flow of blood or other perfusate per unit volume of tissue.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to an eminent research firm, Market Research Future (MRFR) the perfusion market is growing steadily, globally, and is expected to continue growing in the years to come.
XVIVO Perfusion added that the advantage of Perfadex Plus is that it is a complete fluid that is used without the clinic adding buffer and calcium ions before use.
"Because timely revascularization for CLI is a Class I indication in the American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology guidelines, accurate perfusion assessment is critically important," the authors write.
3.1 Set-up of the normothermic porcine spleen perfusion model
Of these, 2 kidneys were abandoned due to renal abnormalities, 1 due to poor perfusion effect, and 3 due to a perfusion resistance index >0.6 before Lifeport transplantation.
Conclusions: In this study, it was determined that the pain decreased with epidural analgesia, perfusion index increased and the pain level increased significantly when the perfusion index started to decrease.
The integration of our market-leading XCell[TM] ATF control technology with SSB's high-performance bioreactors offers a simplified perfusione-nabled bioreactor solution for end users to develop cell culture processes more quickly and implement perfusion more efficiently."
Perfusion to all subjects' lower extremities was measured using the Masimo Radical 7 pulse oximeter (Masimo Corporation, Irvine, California).
This work addressed the reduction of the shear stress effects inside the scaffold pores under perfusion to produce cellularized electrospun structures for clinical application.
Searches employed both controlled vocabularies (e.g., MeSH, EMTREE) and key words such as (DCD livers) and (ex vivo perfusion or normothermic perfusion).
NIR/ICG imaging has been used in various aspects of oncological and reconstructive operations, including identification of tumours for resections, assessment of vascular anastomosis and tissue perfusion, and lymph node dissections [1-5].