perfuse


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per·fuse

(per-fyŭs'),
To force blood or other fluid to flow from the artery through the vascular bed of a tissue or to flow through the lumen of a hollow structure (for example, an isolated renal tubule). Compare: perifuse, superfuse.
[L. perfusio, fr. per- + fusio, a pouring]

per·fuse

(pĕr-fyūz')
To force blood or other fluid to flow from an artery through the vascular bed of a tissue or to flow through the lumen of a hollow structure (e.g., an isolated renal tubule).
[L. perfusio, fr. per- + fusio, a pouring]

perfuse

(pĕr-fūz′) [L. perfundere, to moisten (all over)]
To force or instill (fluids) into an organ or a vessel.
References in periodicals archive ?
This, says the Center, "allows the body to perfuse more oxygen into every cell.
Although the purpose of the compensatory adaptations in heart failure is thought to be an attempt to maintain cardiac output and arterial pressure to adequately perfuse the organs, it is the magnitude of these adaptations that eventually results in a series of maladaptive processes which lead to a decompensated state or even end-stage heart failure.
A perfuse bleeding response that is difficult to stop is likely to indicate a more or less grave inflammatory involvement of the tissue.
The microcirculation is the vast network of small and large end-organ capillaries, which perfuse all tissue beds.
Blood pressure that is less than 120/80 mm Hg in older patients with CAD may be dangerous because these patients have relatively stiff arteries and it may be hard to adequately perfuse important organs at lower blood pressures, Dr.
We inject patients with an MR contrast and watch the breast tissue perfuse and repeat the dynamic series over and over during the course of about 5 minutes and watch that enhancement over time.
needed a higher blood pressure to perfuse her brain because of the edema and elevated ICP.
Thousands of people are seen in emergency departments nation-wide for chest tightness, shortness of breath, dizziness, and perfuse sweating accompanied by shaking, tingling in the extremities, and an imminent sense of doom.
ORS is working on expanding the device's capabilities to perfuse the liver, heart and pancreas in the near future.
On the SACD layer the initial striking of the drumsticks was at once more detailed and perfuse.
The chest cavity was opened quickly, and 20 to 30 mL of 10% buffered formalin was injected directly into the left ventricle to perfuse the body.