animal

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animal

 [an´ĭ-mal]
1. a living organism having sensation and the power of voluntary movement and requiring for its existence oxygen and organic food; animals comprise one of the five kingdoms in the most widely used classification of living organisms.
2. any member of the animal kingdom other than a human being.
3. of or pertaining to such an organism.
control animal an untreated animal otherwise identical in all respects to one that is used for purposes of experiment; used for checking results of treatment.

an·i·mal

(an'i-măl),
1. A living, sentient organism that has membranous cell walls, requires oxygen and organic foods, and is capable of voluntary movement, as distinguished from a plant or mineral.
2. One of the lower animal organisms as distinguished from humans.
[L.]

animal

(ăn′ə-məl)
n.
1. Any of numerous multicellular eukaryotic organisms of the kingdom Metazoa (or Animalia) that ingest food rather than manufacturing it themselves and are usually able to move about during at least part of their life cycle. Sponges, jellyfishes, flatworms, mollusks, arthropods, and vertebrates are animals.
2. An animal organism other than a human, especially a mammal.
Drug slang A regionally popular term for LSD
Pharmacology Any nonhuman animate being endowed with the power of voluntary action

animal

Pharmacology Any nonhuman animate being endowed with the power of voluntary action. See Cat, Cow, Dog, Fish, Horse, Monkey, Pig, Sentinel animal, Snake. Vox populi Etc.

an·i·mal

(an'i-măl)
1. A living, sentient organism that has membranous cell walls, requires oxygen and organic foods, and is capable of voluntary movement, as distinguished from a plant or mineral.
2. One of the lower animal organisms as distinguished from humans.
[L.]

animal

any member of the animal kingdom: organisms that are multicellular and eukaryotic which possess non-photosynthetic, wall-less cells. In some classifications, certain unicellular organisms such as PROTOZOANS are also included.

an·i·mal

(an'i-măl)
1. A living, sentient organism that has membranous cell walls, requires oxygen and organic foods, and is capable of voluntary movement, as distinguished from a plant or mineral.
2. One of the lower animal organisms as distinguished from humans.
[L.]
References in periodicals archive ?
She asked: "What on earth are we doing with performing animals in this day and age?" But officers sought to ease her worries.
Among ordinary zoo animal attractions, the Central Zoo is becoming known for its performing animals: Trained dogs can operate an abacus and monkeys can dunk basketballs.
President Jacob Zuma has referred the Performing Animals Protection Bill back to the National Assembly for reconsideration.
While busy mutilating themselves on Saturday, the 269life brigade also protested outside Birmingham's Sea Life Centre over the use of performing animals.
This group has found a home in a traveling circus, performing in front of audiences who simply think they are watching a regular circus with lions, tigers, and monkeys, clueless to the fact that these performing animals are people.
Among other things, she holds a performing animals licence issued through Durham County Council, a performing animals movement licence and special vehicles to transport her creative creatures safely and smoothly.
They could be right but at this stage, let's just cut out the middle men and make it all performing animals instead of the usual dross involving small children who are led to the finals only to have their dreams crushed in just one woof.
"We only have performing animals, we do not buy animals to put in a cage as a live exhibit.
ere may still be clowns and acrobats, but there are no performing animals - and they are staged in theatres.
It is billed as the Cairnglass Centre for Performing Animals and a "Circus High School".
The book includes the departing Punch professor in William Macgregor's bleak view of Doing the Provinces, as well as the rather more cheerful picture in William Reed's Leith Races, with Punch taking his place alongside pipers, fiddlers, conjurors and performing animals. The book will be of interest not just to those researching puppet theatre, but to all with an interest in folk and popular theatre of the eighteenth, nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
Even though animal shows are still popular, there is a growing awareness about the treatment of performing animals, said Neale.

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