perfluorocarbon


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perfluorocarbon

 [per-floor´o-kahr″bon]
any of various substances chemically related to a hydrocarbons but with the hydrogen atoms replaced by fluorine atoms. In gaseous form they cause environmental damage by collecting in the upper atmosphere; in liquid form, some are used in partial liquid ventilation.

perfluorocarbon

(pĕr-floor″-ă-kahr′ bŭn, -floo″ă-rō-)
A class of solvent molecules that can carry nonpolar gases, such as oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide. They have been used experimentally in transfusion medicine and in some ophthalmic surgeries. Perfluorocarbons are also used as blood gas controls when prepared in buffered solutions equilibrated with CO2 and O2.
References in periodicals archive ?
(24.) Spahn DR (1999) Blood substitutes artificial oxygen carriers: perfluorocarbon emulsions.
Tservakis et al., "Perfluorocarbon liquids in vitreoretinal surgery: a review of applications and toxicity," Cutaneous and Ocular Toxicology, vol.
Error Analysis Techniques for Perfluorocarbon Tracer Derived Multizone Ventilation Rates.
Andrade, "Endobronchial perfluorocarbon administration decreases lung injury in an experimental model of ischemia and reperfusion," Journal of Surgical Research, vol.
A modified technique for extracting a dislocated lens with perfluorocarbon liquids and viscoelastics.
Since then various filling gas such as nitrogen, perfluorocarbons, and sulfur hexafluoride has been used as microbubble which carried a particle size of 1-5 microns.
Intratracheal perfluorocarbon administration combined with mechanical ventilation in experimental respiratory distress syndrome: dose-dependent improvement of gas exchange.
Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory used colorless, nontoxic liquids called perfluorocarbon tracers to essentially fingerprint carbon dioxide that was injected into a coal seam in northwestern New Mexico.
There were several attempts to create alternative blood substitutes based on perfluorocarbon emulsions in order to avoid the intoxication by hemoglobin-containing blood substitutes (Geyer, 1973; Naito and Yokoyama, 1975; Riess, 1991; Shumakov et al., 1993).
The method involves the addition of perfluorocarbon tracers (PFTs) to the injected C[O.sub.2] stream in a predetermined proportion depending on the injection rate at the injection wellhead with a small pump that is capable of matching the well's injection pressure.
(Durham, NC) has submitted a patent application for a new invention that uses Oxycyte perfluorocarbon to deliver oxygen as a first aid treatment for victims of heart attacks and strokes.
The topics of their seven papers include the interaction of drug transporters with excipients, formulation issues around lipid-based oral and parenteral delivery systems, the biological implications of lipid-based parenteral delivery systems, principles in the development of intravenous lipid emulsions, the key factor of protein absorption patterns in determining the in vivo fate of parenteral lipid formulations; nanoparticple targeting for drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier, and lipid-coated perfluorocarbon structures as parenteral therapeutic agents.