perfectionism

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perfectionism

 [per-fek´shun-izm]
the setting for oneself or others of a standard of flawless work or performance, or at least of one that is higher than the situation requires.

per·fec·tion·ism

(per-fek'shŭn-izm),
A tendency to set rigid high standards of performance for oneself.

perfectionism

(pər-fĕk′shə-nĭz′əm)
n.
A propensity for being displeased with anything that is not perfect or does not meet extremely high standards.

per·fec′tion·ist adj. & n.
per·fec′tion·is′tic adj.

perfectionism

[pərfek′shəniz′əm]
Etymology: L, perficere, to complete
a subjective state in which a person pursues an extremely high standard of performance and, in many cases, demands the same standards of others. Failure to attain the goals may lead to feelings of defeat and other adverse psychological consequences.

perfectionism

Psychiatry A personality trait of many physicians, consisting of obsessiveness, overwork, checking compulsions, and other behaviors regarding Pt management, and ↓ ability to enjoy family, friends, and basic human needs. See Anal. Cf Obsessive-compulsive disorder.

per·fec·tion·ism

(pĕr-fek'shŭn-izm)
A tendency to set rigid high standards of performance for oneself.
References in periodicals archive ?
Athletes with low PC for a particular sport would have reduced expectations of success, and perfectionistic thinking would be less likely.
Second cluster consists of Achievement, Self-actualizing, Competitive and Perfectionistic Culture.
Perfectionistic tendencies were assessed at Wave 1 by asking participants various questions on their performance levels in activities such as school and the influence of the expectations of others (e.
2001) showed an interaction between perfectionistic attitudes and body dissatisfaction in female athletes with low self-esteem.
Is there any real advantage in thinking in such perfectionistic and demanding terms?
DIGITAL DETAILS The Simpsons writers have a perfectionistic streak when it comes to math on the show, even when it's just for a throwaway joke.
They will often worry that their work is not of a high enough standard, sometimes becoming quite perfectionistic.
The counselors see a rise in digestive and eating disorders, headaches, generalized anxiety disorder, substance abuse, social and school phobias, and obsessive-compulsive disorders (these are the students who can't let go of details, are perfectionistic, and overwork for school assignments).
People who process social information correctly tend to be great at collaboration and capable of abandoning perfectionistic thinking for a willingness to try again or try something different (23).
Controlling, perfectionistic behavior is very tempting, especially when it is covered by self-justification.