perfectionism


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perfectionism

 [per-fek´shun-izm]
the setting for oneself or others of a standard of flawless work or performance, or at least of one that is higher than the situation requires.

per·fec·tion·ism

(per-fek'shŭn-izm),
A tendency to set rigid high standards of performance for oneself.

perfectionism

(pər-fĕk′shə-nĭz′əm)
n.
A propensity for being displeased with anything that is not perfect or does not meet extremely high standards.

per·fec′tion·ist adj. & n.
per·fec′tion·is′tic adj.

perfectionism

[pərfek′shəniz′əm]
Etymology: L, perficere, to complete
a subjective state in which a person pursues an extremely high standard of performance and, in many cases, demands the same standards of others. Failure to attain the goals may lead to feelings of defeat and other adverse psychological consequences.

perfectionism

Psychiatry A personality trait of many physicians, consisting of obsessiveness, overwork, checking compulsions, and other behaviors regarding Pt management, and ↓ ability to enjoy family, friends, and basic human needs. See Anal. Cf Obsessive-compulsive disorder.

per·fec·tion·ism

(pĕr-fek'shŭn-izm)
A tendency to set rigid high standards of performance for oneself.
References in periodicals archive ?
But the most dramatic finding, by far, was a 33 per cent spike in the kind of perfectionism where teens feel they must be perfect to win approval from others, whether it be friends, social media followers or parents.
As a result, perfectionism is rising among millennials,' Curran said.
They said that there are essentially no published studies on CBT for pediatric perfectionism.
Pobody's nerfect': Wearing odd socks could help you tackle your perfectionism
For example, Fedewa, Burns, and Gomez (2005) found that maladaptive perfectionism was positively correlated with state shame, state guilt, and shame proneness, whereas adaptive perfectionism was positively correlated with pride and negatively correlated with state shame and anxiety.
The Child and Adolescent Perfectionism Scale (CAPS: Flett, Hewitt, Boucher, Davidson, & Munro, 1997).
Perfectionism has an important role to play in understanding both burnout and motivational processes.
Burnout and perfectionism have also been associated in previous research.
Test of the Chinese Version of the Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale [In Chinese].
Perfectionism is a dispositional tendency to strive for flawlessness, set excessively high standards, and experience disappointment with anything falling short of perfection (Frost, Marten, Lahart, & Rosenblate, 1990; Hewitt & Flett, 1991).
In recent years, the emergence of valid and reliable perfectionism scales has contributed to an increased understanding of the association between perfectionism and depression.
Perfectionism has been operationalized along two dimensions: perfectionistic strivings and perfectionistic concerns (Rice, Richardson, & Tueller, 2014; Slaney, Rice, Mobley, Trippi, & Ashby, 2001; Stoeber& Otto, 2006).