perfectionism


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perfectionism

 [per-fek´shun-izm]
the setting for oneself or others of a standard of flawless work or performance, or at least of one that is higher than the situation requires.

per·fec·tion·ism

(per-fek'shŭn-izm),
A tendency to set rigid high standards of performance for oneself.

perfectionism

(pər-fĕk′shə-nĭz′əm)
n.
A propensity for being displeased with anything that is not perfect or does not meet extremely high standards.

per·fec′tion·ist adj. & n.
per·fec′tion·is′tic adj.

perfectionism

Psychiatry A personality trait of many physicians, consisting of obsessiveness, overwork, checking compulsions, and other behaviors regarding Pt management, and ↓ ability to enjoy family, friends, and basic human needs. See Anal. Cf Obsessive-compulsive disorder.

per·fec·tion·ism

(pĕr-fek'shŭn-izm)
A tendency to set rigid high standards of performance for oneself.
References in periodicals archive ?
Perfectionism has a hard time living when compassion enters the picture.
Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a seven-week mindfulness-based relaxation course on undergraduate students' stress, resilience, self-efficacy, and perfectionism in a two-group pre- and post-test study design.
Perfectionism is self-abuse of the highest order - Anne Wilson Schaef
With respect to prior use of Q methodology for studies on perfectionism, we have found none that have already been published.
Given that different profiles of perfectionism show different relationships with a variety of adaptive/functional and maladaptive/dysfunctional processes and outcomes in sport, it seems important to determine if perfectionism in sport may play a role in the social loafing process for athletes (see H0igaard et al., 2010).
The analysis of literature review implies that maladaptive perfectionism is connected with professional burnout.
Thus, our first aim in the meta-analysis was to evaluate the strength of the correlation between procrastination and multidimensional perfectionism.
But the most dramatic finding, by far, was a 33 per cent spike in the kind of perfectionism where teens feel they must be perfect to win approval from others, whether it be friends, social media followers or parents.
The study, published in the journal Psychological Bulletin, suggests that rise in perfectionism among young adults is being driven by a number of factors.
"Perfectionism isn't a disorder; it's a personality style.
The first step to overcoming perfectionism is to recognise it.