peremptory challenge


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Related to peremptory challenge: challenge for cause

peremptory challenge

A challenge to remove a juror from a prospective jury without cause.
See also: challenge
References in periodicals archive ?
right of peremptory challenge 'is, as Blackstone says, an arbitrary
The state agreed that the juror was biased but argued that Ries forfeited the issue by failing to exercise a peremptory challenge. The Supreme Court disagreed.
At the very least, your speaking up will give the prosecution a reason to exercise a peremptory challenge against you.
This may aid judges and attorneys during voir dire and might contribute to the current debate regarding which religion-based peremptory challenges are subject to exclusion under a Batson extension.
As time went on and jury trials became more popular in England, the peremptory challenge was born.
322, 339 (2003) ("In the typical peremptory challenge inquiry, the decisive question will be whether counsel's race-neutral explanation for a peremptory challenge should be believed." (quoting Hernandez v.
(13) Litigants, practically limited to basic identifying data, choose jurors informed by the rough proxies of race, ethnicity, or gender, resulting in the discriminatory use of peremptory challenges. (14) Only those litigants with the financial means to investigate individual jurors can go beyond rough stereotypes to find out detailed personal information about potential jurors for their case.
PROTECTING DIVERSITY WITHOUT LOSING FOCUS ON IMPARTIALITY: IN DEFENSE OF THE PEREMPTORY CHALLENGE A.
This could include on the appellate level a peremptory challenge of one judge.
One woman is among those who have received the sentence, carried out upon "the approval of the presidency and according to a 'peremptory challenge'," according to a ministry statement.
(20) Batson permits the party opposing the use of a peremptory challenge to object and establish a prima facie claim by showing that the strike was used to remove a prospective juror who is a member of a cognizable racial or ethnic group.