percussion


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percussion

 [per-kush´un]
1. in physical examination, striking a part of the body with short, sharp blows of the fingers in order to determine the size, position, and density of the underlying parts by the sound obtained. Percussion is most commonly used on the chest and back for examination of the heart and lungs. For example, since the heart is not resonant and the adjacent lungs are, when the examiner's fingers strike the chest over the heart the sound waves will change in pitch. This serves as a guide to the precise location and size of the heart.
2. the rhythmic clapping of cupped hands over various segments of the lungs to mobilize secretions; called also cupping.
Percussion. (def. 1) From Jarvis, 1996.
auscultatory percussion auscultation of the sound produced by percussion.
immediate percussion that in which the blow is struck directly against the body surface.
mediate percussion that in which a pleximeter is used.
palpatory percussion a combination of palpation and percussion, affording tactile rather than auditory impressions.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

per·cus·sion

(per-kŭsh'ŭn),
1. A diagnostic procedure designed to determine the density of a body part by the sound produced by tapping the surface with the finger or a plessor; performed primarily over the chest to determine presence of normal air content in the lungs and over the abdomen to evaluate air in the loops of intestine and the size of solid organs such as the liver and spleen.
2. A form of massage, consisting of repeated blows or taps of varying force.
[L. percussio, fr. per-cutio, pp. -cussus, to beat, fr. quatio, to shake, beat]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

percussion

(pər-kŭsh′ən)
n.
1. The striking together of two bodies, especially when noise is produced.
2. The sound, vibration, or shock caused by the striking together of two bodies.
3. The act of detonating a percussion cap in a firearm.
4. A method of medical diagnosis in which various areas of the body, especially the chest, back, and abdomen, are tapped to determine by resonance the condition of internal organs.
5. Music
a. The section of a band or orchestra composed of percussion instruments.
b. Percussion instruments or their players considered as a group.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

percussion

Alternative medicine
A massage technique that consists of chopping and drumming by the sides of the hand to “fleshy” tissues (e.g., the back, buttocks and thighs).
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

per·cus·sion

(pĕr-kŭsh'ŭn)
1. A diagnostic procedure designed to determine the density of a part by the sound produced by tapping the surface with the finger or a plessor; performed primarily over the chest to determine presence of normal air content in the lungs and over the abdomen to evaluate air in the loops of intestine.
2. A form of massage, consisting of repeated blows or taps of varying force.
[L. percussio, fr. per-cutio, pp. -cussus, to beat, fr. quatio, to shake, beat]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

percussion

A technique used in examining the chest or the abdomen. A finger of one hand is pressed firmly on the part and tapped briskly with a finger of the other hand. The quality or resonance of the sound produced indicates whether the underlying area is air-filled, fluid-filled or solid.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Percussion

An assessment method in which the surface of the body is struck with the fingertips to obtain sounds that can be heard or vibrations that can be felt. It can determine the position, size, and consistency of an internal organ. It is done over the chest to determine the presence of normal air content in the lungs, and over the abdomen to evaluate air in the loops of the intestine.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

per·cus·sion

(pĕr-kŭsh'ŭn)
Diagnostic procedure designed to determine density of a body part by sound produced by tapping surface with finger or plessor.
[L. percussio, fr. per-cutio, pp. -cussus, to beat, fr. quatio, to shake, beat]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Born in 1804, Victor de Pontigny wrote most of the percussion entries in A Dictionary of Music and Musicians, as indicated in table 1, and his 1892 obituary in The Musical Times described him as "probably the greatest authority of his day on percussive instruments." (14) In 1876, three years before the publication of the dictionary's first volume, de Pontigny delivered an address titled "On Kettledrums" to the newly formed Royal Musical Association, of which Grove was also a member.
Percussion Play is the world's leading outdoor instrument manufacturer who has built their reputation on the excellence of their service and quality of their musical instruments installed in a variety of settings all over the world.
Live performance with George Georgiou on clarinet and Marios Nicolaou on percussion. July 18.
Cahn's chapter on orchestral percussion sets out the responsibilities of the twenty-first century' player who must go beyond simply playing the notes and develop a broader set of skills to succeed as a contemporary professional musician.
In the late 1960s and 1970s, several researchers discovered proboscidean limb bones from the Old Crow River area, Yukon, that were interpreted to have been modified by humans using percussion technology to produce notches and bone flakes (Harington et al., 1975; Irving, 1978; Bonnichsen, 1979; Morian, 1980; Morlan and Cinq-Mars, 1982; Irving et al., 1986; Cinq-Mars and Morian, 1999).
So Percussion have been recording for more than 10 years and are known for collaborating with other musicians and for playing unusual instruments including, it is said, an amplified cactus - although there is unlikely to be any call for that in East Durham.
Technavio's analysts forecast the global percussion instruments market to grow at a CAGR of 0.64% during the period 2016-2020.
It wasn't until the fulminate of mercury was made into a solid pellet and put into a convenient metal container--the percussion cap--around 1820 that the percussion system of ignition took off.
Adding to their original group four more hornists and percussion for this project, the German Hornsound has put together an excellently performed CD of Russian masterpieces for eight horns and percussion arranged by various members of the group.
Was this done at the time it was converted from flintlock to percussion? Please tell me any other information you may know about this type of rifle and give me an estimate of its value if you can.
" I record a lot of percussion tracks for a recording company who later use them for sound effects in movies," he says.
Their chosen specialism means they not only need expertise in a huge array of tuned and un-tuned percussion instruments and timpani, but also the ability to access and appraise instruments according to the requirements of each score and then to carry and set up everything well in advance of each rehearsal or performance.