percolate

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percolate

 [per´ko-lāt]
1. to strain; to submit to percolation.
2. a liquid that has been submitted to percolation.
3. to trickle slowly through a substance.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

percolate

(pĕr′kō-lāt) [L. percolare, to strain through]
1. To allow a liquid to seep through a powdered substance.
2. Any fluid that has been filtered or percolated.
3. To strain a fluid through powdered substances in order to impregnate it with dissolved chemicals.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Lebedev, "Effect of polymer-filler interface interactions on percolation conductivity of thermoplastics filled with carbon black," Composite Interfaces, vol.
T Drzal, "A route for polymer nanocomposites with engineered electrical conductivity and percolation threshold," Materials, vol.
There is a critical composition or also called percolation threshold, at which electrical conduction is increased by several orders of magnitude leading the composite from an insulating range to semiconductive and conductive ranges.
Due to this reason, following the literature [24], the proposed routing and data transmission based on six-degree separation principle are referred to as percolation based routing and data transmission.
4.2 Percolation Routing Process in M2M network with Small-world Properties
It is seen that percolation routing is based on probability thus some paths may reach the destination finally whereas other paths will terminate at other nodes, without reaching the destination.
We found that different compositions of CB/PP/LDPE led to very different conductivities and percolation thresholds, even though at a same CB loading.
1, for the binary composites of CB/PP and CB/LDPE, the percolation are about 9-10 wt%, i.e., 5--5.5 vol%.
"Rheological" Percolation Threshold Determined by Various Methods.
This phenomenon is characteristic of a transition from a liquid-like behavior to a solid-like one and is considered by many as the "theological" percolation threshold (2-8), (23-26).