perceptual

(redirected from perceptually)
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perceptual

(pər-sĕp′cho͞o-əl)
adj.
Of, based on, or involving perception.

per·cep′tu·al·ly adv.
References in periodicals archive ?
A group of 16 directional filters were used for detection of hair using the luminance component of the perceptually uniform CIE L*A *B color space.
3) CIE La*b* is a linear and perceptually uniform color space [35].
Words such as natural and organic convey many things to consumers by perceptually encompassing a wide variety of other health claims and benefits.
In a minimal sense they would notice words - they would be perceptually sensitive to them and respond differentially...
However this color space has a number of drawbacks, it is not perceptually uniform, it depends on the acquisition setup, and it exhibits a high correlation among the three color channels.
"National Shopper Card data shows that gum already is in the same calorie-conscious consideration set as perceptually healthy offerings such as granola, fruits and nuts," Wrigley said in a statement.
Perceptually, an imaginary fundamental frequency may be produced by our auditory system when a series of higher harmonics (equally spaced overtones) is heard.
They address theoretical perspectives on the relationship between perception of facial identity and expression, how expressions are perceptually represented, and multimodal contributions to interpreting other people's emotions; experimental approaches; studies in neuropsychology related to selective impairments that affect the recognition of fear and disgust and generalized impairment affecting identification of all basic emotions; functional brain imaging techniques; and applications to social anxiety and phobia and paraprosopia.
Taking a deeper look, the Beamr optimization process is an iterative closed loop system built around the concept of determining whether the encoded frame is perceptually identical to the input frame.
In the second half of the twentieth century, it regained a central position, materially and perceptually, thanks to the construction of a transportation corridor that facilitated mobility and circulation across the city, but also through the efforts of conservationists such as Charles Sauriol to revitalise the Don and erase its association with blight and marginality.