perceptive

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Related to perceptively: perceptually

per·cep·tive

(per-sep'tiv),
Relating to or having a higher than normal power of perception.

perceptive

(pər-sĕp′tĭv)
adj.
1. Of or relating to perception: perceptive faculties.
2.
a. Having the ability to perceive; keen in discernment.
b. Marked by discernment and understanding; sensitive.

per·cep′tive·ly adv.
per′cep·tiv′i·ty (pûr′sĕp-tĭv′ĭ-tē), per·cep′tive·ness n.

per·cep·tive

(pĕr-sep'tiv)
Relating to or having a higher than normal power of perception.
References in periodicals archive ?
We can read the luminance of a fixture that may have a "glare profile" and compare it perceptively.
If you are nodding perceptively thinking this is only on the occasion of rumours about the impending 'adverse weather condition', - no.
I should stop talking," said chief luvvie Sir Dickie Attenborough perceptively as he paid a marathon tribute to Hopkins - and the final half hour broke new ground in tedium.
2] emissions, and using what is perceptively a fairly reliable resource, it is no surprise that major players in the international economy have started to seriously invest in this resource as an alternative and/or supplement to non-renewable energy sources.
Jessica is able to speak perceptively about her abusive father, alcoholic mother and the autistic younger brother she longs to protect.
The hot summer weather is cooling off, people are hastening to get that last trip in before the pace of life perceptively picks up, and we are making sure everyone is aware of the wonderful resources NRLC has available for them as school is about to begin.
As I have also suspected for a long time, the neocons are quietly preparing for another war behind our backs, as William Jasper correctly and perceptively points out.
The Liverpool-born and Essex-raised son of Nigerian immigrants calls to mind frontmen of the mould of Morrissey or Thom Yorke; perceptively intelligent, sensitive and fearful but angry and socially conscious.
Anyone who dismisses this as an aged perv's fantasy is missing how keenly screenwriter Hanif Kureishi understands coming to terms with mortality (and obviously hasn't seen his and director Roger Michell's ``The Mother,'' which looked at a similar situation just as perceptively from an elderly woman's perspective).
In Richard Hofstadter: An Intellectual Biography, Brown perceptively uses Hofstadter's life as a lens through which to view the rise and fall of liberalism.
It perceptively presents the reader particular choral problems, called "The Complaint,"