perception


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Related to perception: visual perception

perception

 [per-sep´shun]
the conscious mental registration of a sensory stimulus. adj., adj percep´tive.
depth perception the ability to recognize depth or the relative distances to different objects in space.
disturbed sensory perception a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a change in the amount of patterning of incoming stimuli, accompanied by a diminished, exaggerated, distorted, or impaired response to such stimuli.
extrasensory perception (ESP) knowledge of, or response to, an external thought or objective event not achieved as the result of stimulation of the sense organs.

per·cep·tion

(per-sep'shŭn),
The mental process of becoming aware of or recognizing an object or idea; primarily cognitive rather than affective or conative, although all three aspects are manifested.
Synonym(s): esthesia (1)

perception

/per·cep·tion/ (per-sep´shun) the conscious mental registration of a sensory stimulus.percep´tive

perception

[pərsep′shən]
Etymology: L, percipere, to perceive
1 the conscious recognition and interpretation of sensory stimuli that serve as a basis for understanding, learning, and knowing or for motivating a particular action or reaction.
2 the result or product of the act of perceiving. Kinds of perception include depth perception, extrasensory perception, facial perception, and stereognostic perception. perceptive, perceptual, adj.

perception

Paranormal
See Extrasensory perception.
 
Psychology
The constellation of mental processes by which a person recognises, organises and interprets intellectual, sensory and emotional data in a logical or meaningful fashion.

perception

Psychology Mental processes by which intellectual, sensory, and emotional data are organized logically or meaningfully

per·cep·tion

(pĕr-sep'shŭn)
The mental process of becoming aware of or recognizing an object or idea; primarily cognitive rather than affective or conative, although all three aspects are manifested.
Synonym(s): esthesia.

perception

The reception, selection, organization and interpretation of sensory data. Perception is greatly influenced by previous experience and the stored data accumulated from such experience.

perception

the act or process of becoming aware of internal or external sensory stimuli or events, involving the meaningful organization and interpretation of those stimuli. In psychology, perception also applies to evaluations of one's own and others' internal states and beliefs as well as sensory stimuli and a person's perceptions are not necessarily identical to the stimulus object or event being perceived. For example, a person's perceptions of their ability might not match their actual ability. Perception is to be distinguished from sensation which refers to the subjective experience that results from excitation of the sensory apparatus without any interpretation or imposition of meaning.

perception 

The mental process of recognizing and interpreting an object through one or more of the senses stimulated by a physical object. Thus one recognizes the shape, colour, location and differentiation of an object from its background. See sensation; visual integration.
anorthoscopic perception See anorthoscope.
binocular perception Perception obtained through simultaneous use of both eyes.
contour perception See contour.
depth perception Perception of the distance of an object from the observer (absolute distance) or of the distance between two objects (relative distance). Our ability to judge the latter is much more precise than for the former. Many factors contribute to depth perception. Most important is the existence on the two retinae of different images of the same object (called binocular disparity or retinal disparity). There are also many other contributing factors, such as the characteristics of the stimulus (called cues), binocular parallax and, to a smaller extent, the muscular proprioceptive information due to the efforts of accommodation and convergence. Depth perception is more precise in binocular vision but is possible in monocular vision using the following cues: interposition (superposition), relative position, relative size, linear perspective, textural gradient, aerial perspective, light and shade, shadow and motion parallax (Fig. P6). Syn. spatial vision. See stereoscopic visual acuity; visual binocular cliff cell; moon illusion; aerial perspective; linear perspective; relief; Ames room; leaf room; stereopsis.
dermo-optical perception See extrasensory perception.
extrasensory perception Perception obtained by means other than through the ordinary senses as, for example, telepathy (mind reading) or reading by moving a finger over a printed text (dermo-optical perception).
light p . (LP) Term used to indicate a barely seeing eye that can just see light but not the form of objects. Loss of light perception represents blindness.
subliminal perception Stimuli below the threshold of sensation (i.e. subliminal) may, in rare circumstances (e.g. exposure of 40 ms duration masked by another stimulus), unconsciously arouse perception. The effect is then of extremely short duration (less than 200 ms).
visual perception Perception obtained through the sense of vision.
Fig. P6 Examples of monocular cues to depth perception; A, relative size; B, interposition and relative sizeenlarge picture
Fig. P6 Examples of monocular cues to depth perception; A, relative size; B, interposition and relative size

per·cep·tion

(pĕr-sep'shŭn)
The mental process of becoming aware of or recognizing an object or idea.

perception

the conscious mental registration of a sensory stimulus. The ability of animals to perceive is apparent from their responses to the application of stimuli but the nature of the perceptivity is only surmised. The difficulty in examining an animal is to decide whether a failure to respond to a stimulus is due to lack of perception, inability to respond or disinclination to do so.
References in classic literature ?
I know not that l especially needed the lesson, either in the way of warning or rebuke; but at any rate, I learned it thoroughly: nor, it gives me pleasure to reflect, did the truth, as it came home to my perception, ever cost me a pang, or require to be thrown off in a sigh.
The same quick perception of dangers to be avoided and difficulties to be overcome which had warned her to leave the extravagant part of her character costume in the box at Birmingham now kept her mind fully alive to the vast difference between a disguise worn by gas-light for the amusement of an audience and a disguise assumed by daylight to deceive the searching eyes of two strangers.
Some minutes of silent work had passed: and the haggard eyes had looked up again: not with any interest or curiosity, but with a dull mechanical perception, beforehand, that the spot where the only visitor they were aware of had stood, was not yet empty.
Creakle, blinking at him like a young owl; when sleep overpowers me for a minute, he still looms through my slumber, ruling those ciphering-books, until he softly comes behind me and wakes me to plainer perception of him, with a red ridge across my back.
And Nancy's deepest wounds had all come from the perception that the absence of children from their hearth was dwelt on in her husband's mind as a privation to which he could not reconcile himself.
She was gay indeed, and had a certain childish humour; but she had none of that humour which comes of the resigned perception that the world is out of joint, and that you were never born to set it right.
habit, disposition, perception, knowledge, and attitude.
At first, it was a sort of stupefaction; but every moment was quickening her perception of the horrible evil.
The vapor, the influence of that brute force,--it has bewildered me and obscured my perception.
Blunt to learn that the words issuing from her lips had awakened in me the visual perception of a dark- skinned, hard-driven lady's maid with tarnished eyes; even of the tireless Rose handing me my hat while breathing out the enigmatic words: "Madame should listen to her heart.
There is a quickness of perception in some, a nicety in the discernment of character, a natural penetration, in short, which no experience in others can equal, and Lady Russell had been less gifted in this part of understanding than her young friend.
Tess was woman enough to realize from their avowals to herself that Angel Clare had the honour of all the dairymaids in his keeping, and her perception of his care to avoid compromising the happiness of either in the least degree bred a tender respect in Tess for what she deemed, rightly or wrongly, the self-controlling sense of duty shown by him, a quality which she had never expected to find in one of the opposite sex, and in the absence of which more than one of the simple hearts who were his house-mates might have gone weeping on her pilgrimage.