perceived susceptibility

perceived susceptibility

(in health belief model) a person's perception of the likelihood of contracting a disease. Compare perceived severity.
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11] Another study in the USA found that age was not a predictor of knowledge of perceived susceptibility and perceived self-efficacy to heart diseases among the African-American population.
001) improvement in the scores of HBM constructs: perceived susceptibility, perceived severity, perceived benefits, perceived barriers, self-efficacy, and taking health action by the intervention group to the control group.
Perceived susceptibility to infection declined substantially as the epidemic progressed, suggesting that the public gradually perceived fewer risks from pH1N1 virus.
To measure the perceived susceptibility, the standard scale contained 6 questions with (a=0.
s perceived susceptibility in light of the possible consequences of a sedentary lifestyle, as well as an assessment of possible barriers, as described by the Health Belief Model (HBM).
Recognizing the perceived susceptibility and the inherent threat posed to others by socially undesirable media content (Shah et al.
Based on health psychology and risk analysis, the authors suggest that the perception of threat is formed by perceived susceptibility and perceived severity.
The key variables of the HBM include: perceived susceptibility of an individual to a health problem, perceived severity of the problem, perceived threat, perceived benefits of strategies, perceived barriers to effective action, and cues to action (See Figure 1).
In bivariate statistical analysis, greater perceived susceptibility, lower perceived barriers, and having a healthcare provider recommendation were each significantly related to having ever been screened for hepatitis B.
5,9,10] Behavioral factors include individual beliefs on perceived susceptibility, severity, benefits, and barriers associated with eating behavior.
Based on this model, behavior performance results from: (a) perceived barriers to performing behavior; (b) perceived benefits to performing behavior; (c) cues to action for the behavior; (d) perceived severity of threats if the behavior is not performed; and/or (e) perceived susceptibility to risks if the behavior is not performed.
Based on the above introduction, except for perceived susceptibility of influenza, perceived severity of influenza, perceived benefits of influenza vaccination, perceived lower barriers of influenza vaccination, certain demographics, social norms, anticipated regret, worry about influenza infection and perceived control were associated with parental acceptance for child influenza vaccination.