perceived control

perceived control

(pĕr-sēvd′)
The degree to which people feel they are in charge of their own lives, instead of feeling helpless, hopeless, or buffeted by events or other people. People who report that they have significant control tend to feel mentally and physically healthier than those who do not.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, coping style is a disposition that reflects or characterizes an individual's tendency to respond in a predictable manner when confronted with certain types of situations, such as the degree of perceived stress intensity or perceived control (Hock, 1993).
The purpose of the study was to investigate how this patient population perceived control and whether it differed from perceptions of control among physicians.
Additionally, perceived control in the life domain was proposed as a mediator between the impact of CIAD and overall QOL.
The Serenity Prayer was then presented in segments to highlight specific stress management concepts including (a) emotion-focused coping, (b) problem-focused coping, and (c) perceived control.
Intention, perceived control and weight loss: An application of the theory of planned behavior.
Descriptive statistics: Table 1 summarizes the distribution of means and standard deviations for intention, attitude, subjective norm, and perceived control of condom use.
They further looked at how the highest and lowest rated power songs affected both people's sense of power and three previously identified psychological and behavioral consequences of power: the tendency to see the forest instead of the trees (thought abstraction), perceived control over social events (illusion of control), and the desire to move first in competitive interactions.
For example, the two constructs that compose attitude are experiential and instrumental attitude; within perceived norm includes injunctive and descriptive norms, and personal agency consists of perceived control and self-efficacy.
We can say that 40 percent of the variations in intention (dependent variable) are explained by attitude, subjective norms, and perceived control behavior (independent variables).
The team's literature review also revealed three other factors that influence pedestrians' decisions: alcohol use, self-identification as a safe person (pedestrians, for example, who see themselves as accepting only large gaps between vehicles as safe for crossing), and perceived control of the situation (being able to cross partway, for example, by taking refuge at medians).
As noted in the previous paragraph, the relationship between trust and perceived control has been empirically demonstrated in a number of studies, following the proposition that individuals who perceive a match between the objectives of the trust target and themselves are more likely to believe that the trust target will support their efforts to meet those objectives (Warkentin et al.
In particular, clinically anxious mothers are more likely to exhibit parenting behavior that is overly controlling and critical, which is related to lower levels of perceived control (e.

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