peptidoglycan


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peptidoglycan

 [pep″tĭ-do-gli´kan]
a glycan (polysaccharide) attached to short cross-linked peptides; found in bacterial cell walls.

pep·ti·do·gly·can

(pep'ti-dō-glī'kan),
A compound containing amino acids (or peptides) linked to sugars, with the latter preponderant. Compare: glycopeptide.
Synonym(s): mucopeptide (2)

peptidoglycan

/pep·ti·do·gly·can/ (pep″tĭ-do-gli´kan) a glycan (polysaccharide) attached to short cross-linked peptides; found in bacterial cell walls.

peptidoglycan

(pĕp′tĭ-dō-glī′kən, -kăn′)
n.
A polymer found in the cell walls of prokaryotes that consists of polysaccharide and peptide chains in a strong molecular network. Also called mucopeptide, murein.

pep·ti·do·gly·can

(pep'ti-dō-glī'kan)
A compound containing amino acids (or peptides) linked to sugars, with the latter preponderant.
Compare: glycopeptide

peptidoglycan

a main component of bacterial CELL WALLS. Peptidoglycan consists of molecules of SUGARS: N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetylmuramic acid, linked together in rows (forming the glycan portion of peptidoglycan), and adjacent rows are cross-linked by PEPTIDES (forming the peptide portion of peptidoglycan). Peptidoglycan forms a lattice that surrounds and protects the whole cell. Generally, Gram-positive BACTERIA (see GRAM'S STAIN have many layers of peptidoglycan, forming a thick and rigid layer, while gram-negative bacteria have a thin layer of peptidoglycan.

peptidoglycan

a glycan (polysaccharide) attached to short cross-linked peptides; found in bacterial cell walls and is responsible for their structural rigidity.
References in periodicals archive ?
2004) Nod1 responds to peptidoglycan delivered by the Helicobacter pylori cag pathogenicity island.
Keywords: Gold nanoparticles, antibiotics, antibiotic-resistant bacteria, peptidoglycan, cell wall, electromagnetic wave, X-ray, ultrasound.
66,67) The innate immune system recognizes peptidoglycan in the cell wall of gram-positive bacteria and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the cell membrane of gram-negative bacteria to produce an inflammatory response that fights the bacteria.
Gram-positive critters, such as staph, have a thick peptidoglycan layer that shields an inner cellular membrane.
Despite its important role, little is known about how peptidoglycan is made and how antibiotics interfere with it at the biochemical levels.
In the example of peptidoglycan, the pure substance alone does not induce any 1L-1B response at concentrations between 10 pg/ml and 100 [micro]g/ml (data not shown).
aureus associated infections are treatable with AY lactam antibiotics that target biosynthesis of the essential component of bacterial cell wall that is peptidoglycan.
Research supporting this mechanism has shown that the impaired immune response against viral infection in antibiotic-treated mice can be reversed by intrarectal or intranasal administration of TLR ligands such as bacterial LPS (TLR4 agonist) and bacterial peptidoglycan (TLR2 agonist) (Ichinohe et al.
Lysozymes digest the extensive peptidoglycan layer of some gram-positive bacteria (11).
This work zeroes in on trying to stop construction of a bacterial cell layer called peptidoglycan, a mesh-like structure that, in gram-negative bacteria like E.
When peptidoglycan is present from bacteria in platelets, it triggers a reaction cascade which ends in the development of a red color.