peppermint


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Related to peppermint: peppermint candy

pep·per·mint

(pep'ĕr-mint),
Dried leaves and flowering tops of Mentha piperita (family Labiatae); a carminative and antiemetic.

peppermint

/pep·per·mint/ (-mint) the perennial herb Mentha piperita, or a preparation of its dried leaves and flowering tops, which have carminative, gastric stimulant, and counterirritant properties; used for gastrointestinal, liver, and gallbladder disturbances; also used in folk medicine and in homeopathy.

peppermint

(pĕp′ər-mĭnt′)
n.
1. A hybrid perennial plant (Mentha ×piperita) in the mint family, having small purple or white flowers and downy leaves that yield a pungent oil used as a flavoring and in some medicinal preparations.
2. A candy or lozenge flavored with oil from this plant.

peppermint

the dried leaves and flowering tops of an herb, Mentha piperita. A source of a volatile oil, it is used as a carminative and antiemetic.
A perennial herb that contains azulene, betaine, carotenoids, choline, flavonoids, menthol, rosmarinic acid, tannins, and volatile oil containing bisabolene, cineole, limonene, menthol, menthone, pulegol, etc; peppermint leaves and stalks are analgesic, antibacterial, antiparasitic, antispasmodic, carminative, diaphoretic, stimulating, a nerve tonic, and sedative
Chinese medicine Peppermint is used in Chinese herbal medicine as an infusion for cough, flatulence, headaches, laryngitis, indigestion, menstrual disorders, sinusitis
Herbal medicine Uses Internally for colic, flatulence, inflammation, and increased bile flow, inhaled as an expectorant, for respiratory tract infections, and topically as a local anaesthetic
Toxicity Pure peppermint should not be ingested, as it causes arrhythmias; peppermint tea should be ingested with caution in young children and pregnancy, and never in women with a history of miscarriage

peppermint,

n See mint.

pep·per·mint

(pep'ĕr-mint)
Dried leaves and flowering tops of Mentha piperita; carminative and antiemetic.
References in periodicals archive ?
Enteric-coated, pH-dependent peppermint oil capsules for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome in children.
Peppermint is especially wonderful for tired legs and feet because it feels cool and soothing.
Peppermint oil has a long history of safe use both in medicinal preparations and as a flavoring agent in foods and confectionery.
In the present work we determined the composition of the essential oil using commercial peppermint samples from Estonia and from other European countries.
In one recent study that included 409 patients undergoing colonoscopy, a solution containing 8 mL of peppermint oil per liter of water was administered intraluminally by hand pump, with satisfactory control of spasms in 88.
At the end of the day, you can pour yourself a refreshing cup of Aveda Comforting Tea ($13 for four ounces), which is a caffeine-free herbal blend made with organic peppermint, licorice root and flower essences.
There now is further evidence available supporting the effectiveness of peppermint oil," Dr.
No safety data exist on the use of peppermint oil during pregnancy and lactation.
Recently, 40 athletes took part in an experiment published in the Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology to determine whether smelling peppermint could lead to increased athletic performance.
Vie en Rose is a blend of lavender, hibiscus flowers, rose petals and peppermint.
Peppermint oil is the most well known and widely used of all carminatives.
Forty athletes performed a series of physical tasks under two conditions--without smelling peppermint odor and while smelling peppermint.