poverty

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Related to penury: indigence, sublime

pov·er·ty

peniaphobia.

poverty

[pov′ərtē]
Etymology: L, paupertas
1 a lack of material wealth needed to maintain existence.
2 a loss of emotional capacity to feel love or sympathy.

poverty

The state of being deprived of the essentials of well-being, such as adequate housing, food, sufficient income, employment, access to required social services and social status. The most commonly used threshold of low income in the UK is a household income that is ≤ 60% of the average (median) British household income. In 2008/9, poverty was defined in terms of the amount of money left after income tax, council tax and housing costs (rent, mortgage interest, buildings insurance and water charges) have been deducted: £119 per week for single adult with no dependent children and £288 per week for a couple with two dependent children under 14. These sums of money represent what the household has left to spend on food, heating, travel, entertainment, and any needs or wants. In 2008/09, 13 million people in the UK were living in households below this low-income threshold—i.e., 22% of the population—compared 12 million at that level in 2004/05.

poverty

(pov′ĕrt-ē) [Fr. poverté, fr L. paupertas]
The condition of having an inadequate supply of money, resources, or means of subsistence. In 2010 in the U.S., for example, a family of four earning less than $22,000 was considered to live in poverty.

poverty of thought

The mental state of being devoid of thought and having a feeling of emptiness.
References in periodicals archive ?
Wild argues that the slavery that established coffee as a global mass-market product has been replaced by penury for developing-world farmers, who suffer at the hands of predatory conglomerates and the misguided policies of international development banks.
These godly gadflies, despised for the sin of prophesying against the state, blasted the greed of landowners who coveted and seized the homes of the poor, the usury of moneylenders who drove their debtors into penury, the deceit of merchants who defrauded widows and aliens, the cruelty of tyrants who oppressed their peoples, and the venality of priests, judges, and court prophets whose services were always for sale to the highest bidder.
6 million Iraqis, and reduced an oil rich nation to penury.
Rather than bury him, the family decides to keep him at home until the following Monday, when they can claim his pension and thus dodge penury.
Over a period of more than 5,000 years, wherever farmers produced a surplus of food over their own needs, the urban elites, possessing military power, could be counted on to take advantage of their power to appropriate their food supply and in the process reduce the farmers to penury.
Neither truck nor tractor drives Kas Maine out of penury.
And why they did not use their fame to air their grievances against companies that literally made millions of dollars off the black community while keeping black artists in a state much closer to penury than affluence is a question that Deffaa should have addressed.
This ambitious development plan comes at a time when Russia has, in penury, had to call for emergency financial aid of more than USD20 billion to support the Rouble.
In 1849 he went to Paris and in 1852 to the United States, but in 1854 he returned via England to Paris, where he led a life of penury and obscurity until his death.
The savings of many middle-class Germans vanished and they were reduced to penury.
The political parties and power blocs shaping South Africa's constitutional and political form attending the Convention for a Democratic South Africa (CODESA) must guard against following the path into African-style national and individual penury in neighbouring countries brought on by successions of incompetent leadership or war.