pentastomiasis

pen·ta·sto·mi·a·sis

(pen'tă-stō-mī'ă-sis),
Infection of herbivorous animals, swine, and humans with larval tongue worms; lesions occur principally in the lymph nodes of the digestive tract, where they often resemble those caused by tuberculosis.

pentastomiasis

(pĕn″tă-stō-mī′ă-sĭs)
Infection with certain genera of Pentastomida, the tongue worms. The larval forms usually live in the bodies of animals but have been reported in humans.

pentastomiasis

infection by parasites of the phylum Pentastomida; found in the respiratory tract of reptiles.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In November 2015, a surgeon from Belgium, working for Medics without Vacation in Bassila, Benin, Africa, incidentally discovered pentastomiasis in an adult man during surgery for a massive inguinoscrotal hernia (half a liter content).
Linguatula serrata and Armillifer armillatus were associated with 99% of the reported cases of human pentastomiasis (Drabick, 1987; Pare, 2008).
According to the study, people can also catch certain diseases (trichinosis, pentastomiasis, gnathostomiasis and sparganosis) by eating reptile meat.
Most cases of human pentastomiasis are caused by two species of pentastomids, both of which have characteristics of arthropods and annelids, viz.
Co-Infections in Visceral Pentastomiasis, Democratic Republic of the Congo
In natural intermediate hosts (rodents and small monkeys), and accidentally humans, larvae hatch in the gastrointestinal tract after ingestion of pentastomid eggs, leading to dissemination and, eventually, to encapsulation of the vermiform larvae in internal organs (most often abdominal or peritoneal organs [visceral pentastomiasis (1)]) or in the eye (ocular pentastomiasis (7,8)]).
To the Editor: Pentastomiasis is a parasitic zoonotic disease with an incremental number of reported human infections caused by larval stages (nymphs) of pentastomes (1-3).
Nasopharyngeal pentastomiasis (Halzoun): report of 3 cases.
Most documented human infections are caused by members of the species Armillifer armillatus, which cause visceral pentastomiasis in West and Central Africa (2-4).