pentastomiasis

pen·ta·sto·mi·a·sis

(pen'tă-stō-mī'ă-sis),
Infection of herbivorous animals, swine, and humans with larval tongue worms; lesions occur principally in the lymph nodes of the digestive tract, where they often resemble those caused by tuberculosis.

pentastomiasis

(pĕn″tă-stō-mī′ă-sĭs)
Infection with certain genera of Pentastomida, the tongue worms. The larval forms usually live in the bodies of animals but have been reported in humans.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Linguatula serrata and Armillifer armillatus were associated with 99% of the reported cases of human pentastomiasis (Drabick, 1987; Pare, 2008).
According to the study, people can also catch certain diseases (trichinosis, pentastomiasis, gnathostomiasis and sparganosis) by eating reptile meat.
Pentastomiasis, also known as 'tongue worm' infestation or porocephalosis, is a parasitic zoonosis endemic to western and central Africa.
In November 2015, a surgeon from Belgium, working for Medics without Vacation in Bassila, Benin, Africa, incidentally discovered pentastomiasis in an adult man during surgery for a massive inguinoscrotal hernia (half a liter content).
Snakeborne pentastomiasis, a parasitic zoonotic disease in rural tropical areas where snake meat is eaten (1,2), is caused by a unique group of crustacean-related parasites (3,4).
To the Editor: Pentastomiasis is a parasitic zoonotic disease with an incremental number of reported human infections caused by larval stages (nymphs) of pentastomes (1-3).