pension

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Related to pension funds: Mutual funds

pension

(1) A regular payment plan intended to provide a person who retired from a job with a secure income for life.
(2) A monthly payment from a pension.
References in periodicals archive ?
They are UTI Retirement Benefit Pension Fund and Templeton India Pension Fund.
It is the Commission's resolve to ensure that proper due-diligence is done, even at the expense of some delays, to ensure that we implement a pension fund that is not only sustainable, but also affordable and attractive to our members.
As Janko Trenkovski from the KB First Pension Fund stressed, the institutional investors, such as pension funds, are main investors in long-term securities but such of two, five or ten years have not been yet issued on the domestic market by the Republic of Macedonia.
Contrary to public statements made by pension fund board members, the Detroit retirement systems have not "lost" their $30 million investment.
These solutions enable pension funds to protect their members' benefits by strengthening and stabilising their financial position, reducing their exposure to unrewarded volatility and making future cash flows more predictable.
The Boots pension fund trustees cannot say that they have not been warned and if they have not studied the history of the private equity industry in this matter then they are being negligent.
The other participants are the Los Angeles Police and Fire Pension Fund and the Los Angeles County Employee Retirement Association.
He notes that GM's pension fund has made a 9-to 10-percent return for the past 15 years in good markets and bad, and that GM sees no need to lower its investment goals.
But this regulation scared off many employee pension funds from returning the pension assets due to fears that they would incur huge financial losses because they would have to add more stock issues to their pension funds to meet the requirement.
The allocation, it was claimed, doomed Japanese pension funds to substandard returns, because while the stock market was soaring, fixed income returns were in a secular decline.
JOHN FEELY, chairman of the Irish Association of Pension Funds, writes: