penetrating trauma


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Related to penetrating trauma: penetrating wound, Abdominal Trauma

penetrating trauma

Urgent care An injury sustained as a result of either
1. Sharp force, which includes injuries from cutting or piercing instruments or objects and nonvenomous bites of pets or humans or.
2. Firearm injuries from projectiles Cf Blunt trauma.
References in periodicals archive ?
Due to armed conflict over the last decades of the last century, there have been great changes in clinical management, as well as in morbidity and mortality due to penetrating trauma of the colon and cardiac trauma.
Women are more likely to suffer blunt injuries than penetrating traumas, whereas men present a very high prevalence of the latter, which usually have greater lethality (7, 9, 12-15).
1--Standards reached at the end of surgery in a cohort of thoraco-abdominal penetrating trauma Source: authors.
He said the trauma center on the south side of Chicago sees about a 35 percent rate, while Parkland Hospital in Dallas has about a 40 to 45 penetrating trauma rate.
Management of penetrating trauma to the soft palate: a case report.
The most common causes of traumatic AV fistulas are penetrating injuries into adjacent arteries and veins.[2] Today, these lesions are largely sequelae of medical procedures.[1] Iatrogenic fistulas have been reported to follow phlebotomy,[1] percutaneous biopsy of the kidney, cardiac catheterization, nephrectomy,[3] end orthopedic procedures.[4] In contrast, penetrating trauma from knife stab wounds, gunshot injuries, and shrapnel fragments account for the largest percentage of cases in times of war.
TRs are also a potential source of data for ongoing surveillance of morbidity and mortality resulting from specific types of injuries, such as blunt trauma, penetrating trauma, and burns[9].
While urinomas remain a rare entity, one must have a high degree of suspicion for one involved in blunt or penetrating trauma. A dedicated CT scan for a urinoma, which omits the parenchymal phase and involves a low dose noncontrast phase followed by a delayed image phase ten minutes after IV contrast administration, can help with the diagnosis as well as aspiration [7, 8].
This location, between chest and abdomen, exposes it to injury by closed or penetrating trauma to the thoracoabdominal transition area on either side [1, 2].
The incidence of penetrating trauma is at obvious rise both in military and civilian7,8.
The predominant mechanism of injury was blunt trauma (78.4%) and penetrating trauma accounted for 11.0% of cases.
Its occurrence rate is approximately 0.3% in penetrating trauma.1 Venous bullet embolisms however, are incredibly rare.