pendrin


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pendrin

(pen'drin),
A chloride-iodide transporter protein encoded by the gene responsible for Pendred syndrome, important in function of thyroid gland, kidney, and inner ear.
References in periodicals archive ?
SLC26A4 encodes pendrin protein, is associated with Pendred syndrome and enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA).
Previous studies largely focused on the identification and regulation of apically expressed Cl- transporters, including Na+-Cl- cotransporter, Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransporter (NKCC1/NKCC2) and pendrin, but mechanisms and regulation of Cl- transporters on basolateral membranes (i.
sup][16],[17] The results reported provide a basis for future studies aimed at developing and testing pendrin inhibitors for use in asthma exacerbations.
ATPase and pendrin was significantly higher among patients than in controls.
Investigators have developed assays for the detection of circulating mRNA species coding for thyroid peroxidase (TPO), the sodium iodine symporter (NIS), pendrin (PDS), the thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) and Tg.
When the SLC26A4 gene is mutated, it leads to a loss of pendrin expression, which causes swelling of the inner ear and loss of hearing and balance," Philine Wangemann, university distinguished professor of anatomy and physiology in the College of Veterinary Medicine, said.
Effects of thyroglobulin and pendrin on iodide flux through the thyrocyte.
In separate countries in 5% of cases was determined mutation of myosin 15, pendrin, stereosilin; in 3% of cases was determined mutation of otoferlin and mitochondrial gene 12S p-RNA.
The pendrin protein, which mediates iodide transport across the thyroidal apical membrane into the follicular lumen, where it is used in the iodination of thyroglobulin, is one such possible target (MA DEP 2006; Scinicariello et al.
Recently, a second mechanism for cellular transport of iodine has been reported by several investigators in the thyroid, mammary gland, and renal cortex, namely a chloride/iodide transporter identified as pendrin.
The main fate of absorbed iodide is uptake and concentration by the thyroid gland via an active transport mechanism known as the iodine transporter or as pendrin.
As reported in the December 1997 Nature Genetics, the investigators finally struck gold with a gene that appears to encode a protein, which they call pendrin, that ferries sulfate molecules across cellular membranes.