pencil pusher


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pencil pusher

A derogatory term for a low-level bureaucrat—e.g., in an academic centre, hospital, regulatory or reimbursement agency.
References in periodicals archive ?
The research found that students who multitasked on their laptops performed significantly worse than the pencil pushers, and their effect even reached to students sitting near the laptop users.
Heather Brown wrote: "I'm sure most people with disabilities are sick to the back teeth of being told by pencil pushers what's best for them.
Hmm and now we're wishing for the next study to come our way to be on the squares in the officeC*the pencil pushers can't all be goody two-shoes right?
It's the code name I gave these government pencil pushers long ago.
As Congress decides whether astronauts and the rest of us will be rejected by insurance company drones or government pencil pushers, we can imagine the following scenario:
When they designed the current-generation Civic, the Japanese pencil pushers left the soft, boring lines of its predecessor behind and went for broke.
That would satisfy the pencil pushers and let a true football man get on with improving the team, while he could also take a crash course to get the qualifications over time if need be.
He doesn't have enough square feet in his laboratory to accommodate 17 pencil pushers," Fishbein told SCIENCE NEWS, "never mind finding the money for their salaries.
Currently there are over 30 professional tax programs; the leading products are: Arthur Andersen's A-Plustax, CCH Computax's Prosystem FX, CLR Fast-Tax and Pencil Pushers.
There are the usual and typical comments from the doubtful and economic pencil pushers that predict many problems, which include raw material shortages, government controls, international trade difficulties and many others.
Pencil Pushers, CLR/Fast Tax and Arthur Andersen have announced that they will have a full-blown Windows versions for the 1995 season, although Arthur Andersen will be limiting its distribution.
The sports media were gobbling down their free pre-game meal and lamenting the inevitable: The Islanders--a sportswriter's dream loaded with a group of articulate, honest, and stand-up players--eventually would be eliminated (it didn't happen until the next round against Montreal) and the great gathering of pencil pushers and microphone draggers would have to return to the baseball beat.