pelvimetry


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Related to pelvimetry: clinical pelvimetry

pelvimetry

 [pel-vim´ĕ-tre]
measurement of the capacity and diameter of the pelvis, either internally or externally or both, with the hands or with a pelvimeter.

pel·vim·e·try

(pel-vim'ĕ-trē),
Measurement of the diameters of the pelvis.
[pelvi- + G. metron, measure]

pelvimetry

(pĕl-vĭm′ĭ-trē)
n.
Measurement of the dimensions and capacity of the pelvis, especially of the adult female pelvis.

pel·vim′e·ter n.

pelvimetry

Imaging A radiologic study in which the diameters of the osseous birth canal are compared with that of the infant's head to determine whether the pelvis is of sufficient diameter to allow a normal vaginal delivery. See Pelvic ultrasonography, X-ray pelvimetry.

pel·vim·e·try

(pel-vim'ĕ-trē)
Measurement of the diameters of the pelvis.
[pelvi- + G. metron, measure]

pelvimetry

The measurement or assessment of the outlet of the female pelvis. This is done so as to anticipate possible difficulty in delivery of the baby.
References in periodicals archive ?
The interspinous distance was chosen as the measurement of external pelvimetry because it is more visible, stable and easy to measure; however, other pelvic points, like the highest point of the iliac crest, can be prone to error because, on many occasions, it is covered by abundant adipose tissue.
The obstetric conjugate diameter, which corresponds to internal pelvimetry, was selected because it represents the narrowest space of the initial part of the birth canal and can be easily measured by ultrasonography.
Pelvimetry revisited: analyzing cephalopelvic disproportion.
Pelvimetry by reformatted computed tomography in 290 female pelvis.
Three-dimensional pelvimetry by computed tomography.
Dosimetry comparison of pelvimetry methods using conventional radiographs and CT.
Is there a role for X-ray pelvimetry in the twenty-first century?.
Clinical pelvimetry made the largest contribution, in keeping with the high proportion of intrapartum transfers due to arrests of labor.
When the same analysis was performed for multiparas, only 16% of whom required delivery in the hospital when they had planned otherwise, clinical pelvimetry was no longer important.
Potential bias remains, however, in the recording of some items requiring subjective judgment such as patient requests, length of labor, blood loss, and possibly Apgar scores and clinical pelvimetry.[25] Most important, the patients choosing OHB are not comparable to those choosing hospital births, medically (except by controlling for prenatal risk score), demographically, or in less tangible ways such as motivation.