pelvic floor

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pelvic floor

the soft tissues enclosing the pelvic outlet.

pelvic floor

A well-defined region bounded anteriorly by the pubis, posteriorly by the sacrum, laterally by the ischial and iliac bones, superiorly by the peritoneum, and inferiorly by the levator ani and coccygeus muscles, the last of which form the pelvic diaphragm.
 
Pelvic floor tissues
Uterus, adnexae, bladder, rectum, neurovascular tissues.

menopause

Change of life, climacteric, 'time of life'  Gynecology The cessation of menstrual activity due to failure to form ovarian follicles, which normally occurs age 45–50 Clinical Menstrual irregularity, vasomotor instability, 'hot flashes', irritability or psychosis, ↑ weight, painful breasts, dyspareunia, ↑/↓ libido, atrophy of urogenital epithelium and skin, ASHD, MI, strokes and osteoporosis–which can be lessened by HRT. See Estrogen replacement therapy, Hot flashes, Male menopause, Premature ovarian failure, Premature menopause. Cf Menarche.
Menopause–”…what a drag it is getting old.” Jagger, Richards
Bladder Cystourethritis, frequency/urgency, stress incontinence
Breasts ↓ Size, softer consistency, sagging
Cardiovascular Angina, ASHD, CAD
Endocrine Hot flashes
Mucocutaneous Atrophy, dryness, pruritus, facial hirsutism, dry mouth
Neurologic Psychological, sleep disturbances
Pelvic floor Uterovaginal prolapse
Skeleton  Osteoporosis, fractures, low back pain
Vagina Bloody discharge, dyspareunia, vaginitis
Vocal cords Deepened voice
Vulva  Atrophy, dystrophy, pruritus

pelvic floor

The connective tissues and muscles (including the coccygeus and the levator ani muscles) that lie beneath and support the perineum and pelvis. Weakening of the tissues of the pelvic floor can occur during childbirth or after radiation, surgery, or trauma to the pelvis, resulting in pelvic floor disorders such as organ prolapse or urinary or fecal incontinence. Synonym: pelvic diaphragm; pelvic support
See also: floor
References in periodicals archive ?
General health and fitness is also a factor - the fitter the woman, the more toned her pelvic-floor muscles will be.
Having access to simple advice about continence and how to perform pelvic-floor exercises could make a huge difference for millions of women.
To perform pelvic-floor exercises sit, stand or lie with your knees slightly apart.