pelvic cavity


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Related to pelvic cavity: abdominal cavity, cranial cavity, Spinal cavity

cavity

 [kav´ĭ-te]
1. a hollow or space, or a potential space, within the body or one of its organs; called also caverna and cavum.
2. the lesion produced by dental caries.
Cavities in the body. From Applegate, 2000.
abdominal cavity the cavity of the body between the diaphragm above and the pelvis below, containing the abdominal organs.
absorption c's cavities in developing compact bone due to osteoclastic erosion, usually occurring in the areas laid down first.
amniotic cavity the closed sac between the embryo and the amnion, containing the amniotic fluid.
cranial cavity the space enclosed by the bones of the cranium.
glenoid cavity a depression in the lateral angle of the scapula for articulation with the humerus.
marrow cavity (medullary cavity) the cavity that contains bone marrow in the diaphysis of a long bone; called also medullary canal.
nasal cavity the proximal portion of the passages of the respiratory system, extending from the nares to the pharynx; it is divided into left and right halves by the nasal septum and is separated from the oral cavity by the hard palate.
oral cavity the cavity of the mouth, bounded by the jaw bones and associated structures (muscles and mucosa).
pelvic cavity the space within the walls of the pelvis.
pericardial cavity the potential space between the epicardium and the parietal layer of the serous pericardium.
peritoneal cavity the potential space between the parietal and the visceral peritoneum.
pleural cavity the potential space between the two layers of pleura.
pulp cavity the pulp-filled central chamber in the crown of a tooth.
cavity of septum pellucidum the median cleft between the two laminae of the septum pellucidum. Called also pseudocele, pseudocoele, and fifth ventricle.
serous cavity a coelomic cavity, like that enclosed by the pericardium, peritoneum, or pleura, not communicating with the outside of the body and lined with a serous membrane, i.e., one which secretes a serous fluid.
tension cavity cavities of the lung in which the air pressure is greater than that of the atmosphere.
thoracic cavity the portion of the ventral body cavity situated between the neck and the diaphragm; it contains the pleural cavity.
tympanic cavity the major portion of the middle ear, consisting of a narrow air-filled cavity in the temporal bone that contains the auditory ossicles and communicates with the mastoid air cells and the mastoid antrum by means of the aditus and the nasopharynx by means of the auditory tube. The middle ear and the tympanic cavity were formerly regarded as being synonymous.
uterine cavity the flattened space within the uterus communicating proximally on either side with the fallopian tubes and below with the vagina.

pel·vic cav·i·ty

[TA]
the space bounded peripherally by the pelvic girdle, above by the superior aperture of the pelvis, and below by the pelvic diaphragm; it contains the pelvic viscera.

pel·vic cav·i·ty

(pel'vik kav'i-tē) [TA]
The space bounded at the sides by the bones of the pelvis, above by the superior aperture of the pelvis, and below by the pelvic diaphragm; it contains the pelvic viscera.

cavity

1. a hollow or space, or a potentional space, within the body (e.g. abdominal cavity) or one of its organs (e.g. cranial cavity).
2. in teeth, the lesion produced by dental caries.

absorption c's
cavities in developing compact bone due to osteoclastic erosion, usually occurring in the areas laid down first.
amniotic cavity
the closed sac between the embryo and the amnion, containing the amniotic fluid.
cranial cavity
the space enclosed by the bones of the cranium.
dental cavity
1. the central space, often branched or multiple in compound teeth, of each tooth; carries the nerve and blood supplies to the teeth.
2. the defect caused by decay on a tooth surface. Called also caries.
glenoid cavity
a depression in the ventral angle of the scapula for articulation with the humerus.
infraglottic cavity
the space in the larynx caudal to the vocal folds; reflects the shape of the cricoid cartilage.
medullary (marrow) cavity
the cavity, containing marrow, in the diaphysis of a long bone; called also medullary canal.
nasal cavity
the proximal part of the respiratory tract, within the nose, bisected by the nasal septum and extending from the nares to the pharynx. Much of the cavity is occupied by the turbinate bones or conchae which also divide it into dorsal, medial and ventral meatuses. The common meatus is the narrow, vertical passage close to the nasal septum. The rostral end of the cavity just inside the nostril is the nasal vestibule, and the caudal part opening into the pharynx is the nasopharyngeal meatus.
oral cavity
the cavity of the mouth, made up of a vestibule and oral cavity proper.
pelvic cavity
the space within the walls of the pelvis.
pericardial cavity
the potential space between the epicardium and the parietal layer of the serous pericardium.
peritoneal cavity
the potential space between the parietal and the visceral peritoneum.
pleural cavity
the potential space between the parietal and the visceral pleura.
pulp cavity
the pulp-filled central chamber in a tooth; called also dental cavity.
serous cavity
a celomic cavity, like that enclosed by the pericardium, peritoneum or pleura, not communicating with the outside of the body and lined with a serous membrane, i.e. one which secretes a serous fluid.
tension cavity
cavities of the lung in which the air pressure is greater than that of the atmosphere.
thoracic cavity
the body cavity situated between the neck and the diaphragm.
tympanic cavity
the cavity of the middle ear.
uterine cavity
the space within the uterus communicating on either side with the uterine tubes and caudally with the vagina.

pelvic

pertaining to the pelvis.

pelvic abscess
commonest in horses as a result of a rectal tear during a manual examination. The tear is only mucosa deep and the infection is deposited in the pelvic fascia where an abscess develops. This has the potential to erode into the peritoneal cavity. The syndrome begins as a toxemia and fever caused by the local abscess but a common sequel is the abrupt appearance of severe abdominal pain and toxemic shock.
pelvic bone
os coxae, comprising the ilium, ischium and pubis. See also Table 10.
pelvic canal
the canal from the pelvic inlet to the pelvic outlet.
pelvic cavity
the space bounded by the bones of the pelvis.
pelvic girdle
the bony ring formed by the pair of hip bones fused at the symphysis and their firm articulation with the sacrum, and in some species one or two coccygeal vertebrae.
pelvic inlet
the cranial opening of the pelvis.
pelvic intestinal hernia
see pelvic hernia.
pelvic ligaments
include the dorsal sacroiliac, the sacrotuberal and the iliolumbar ligaments.
pelvic limb
the hindlimb.
pelvic nerve
see Table 14.
pelvic organs
includes reproductive organs, urinary bladder, ureter, rectum.
pelvic outlet
the caudal opening of the pelvis, guarded by the pelvic diaphragm.
pelvic plexus
the autonomic plexus that is distributed to the pelvic viscera that consists of the cranial vesical plexus, the middle genital plexus and the caudal hemorrhoidal plexus, located on the ventrolateral surface of the rectum. It innervates the urinary bladder, prostate, ductus deferens and cranial urethra. It is supplied by the hypogastric and pelvic splanchnic nerves.
pelvic splanchnic nerves
pelvic symphysiotomy
surgical separation of the symphysis in immature animals as an aid in dystocia due to maternal pelvic inadequacy.
pelvic urethra
that part of the urethra that passes through the pelvis.
pelvic viscera
includes urinary bladder and pelvic ureters and urethra, rectum, prostate, seminal vesicles, vas deferens and ampullae in males, and vagina cervix and uterus, possibly ovaries, in the female.
References in periodicals archive ?
Even though the most prevalent causes of sciatica are intraspinal pathologies especially in cases with unexplained painful conditions, extraspinal abnormalities should be conceived, and the pelvic cavity should be examined to that end.
In this condition, menstrual blood doesn't flow out of the cervix (the opening of the uterus to the vagina), but, instead, is pushed backward out of the uterus through the fallopian tubes into the pelvic cavity.
In the four cases with malpositioned catheters but no adhesions, the catheters were repositioned in the pelvic cavity and fixed with sutures.
The pelvic cavity contains organs such as the urinary bladder, the rectum, the inferior parts of the ureters and the reproductive system, as well as blood vessels, lymphatics and nerves.
Sometimes a part of IUCD is stuck up in the pelvic cavity while other part with the stone is present in urinary bladder.
Trans-abdominal ultrasonography confirmed the finding of a left tubo-ovarian mass denoting a live fetus corresponding to 7 weeks and 6 days of gestation with free fluid in the pelvic cavity.
Bleeding in the pelvic cavity causes inflammation and pain.
The pelvic cavity, where the rectum lies, is a narrow space, making rectal tumors difficult to access," he explains.
Hot carcass weight (HCW) and the fat yield associated with kidney, pelvic cavity, heart, intestine, and stomach (KPHISY) were measured just after slaughter.
After a survey of the pelvic cavity to rule out any sign of metastases in the abdominal cavity and to identify any associated pathology that needs to be treated, such as adhesions that need to be lysed, we proceed with the lymphadenectomy.
Vaginismus is the involuntary tightening of the PC, or pubococcygeus, muscle (a hammock-shaped muscle that stretches from the pubic bone to the tail bone, forming the floor of the pelvic cavity and supporting the pelvic organs), which makes vaginal penetration of any kind--with fingers, dildos, speculums, penises--difficult to nearly impossible.