pejorative

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pejorative

Medtalk Bad…real bad

pejorative

(pĭ-jawr′ă-tĭv) (pē″jă-rā′tĭv) [L. pejor, worse]
1. Tending to become or make worse.
2. Disparaging or belittling.
References in periodicals archive ?
And I relished Orwell's pessimistic - not using that pejoratively here - prescriptions for our future.
These injunctions have been pejoratively described as 'gagging orders' by the media and the supporters of a free press and freedom of expression in the United Kingdom and elsewhere.
In certain British enclaves - school playgrounds, in particular - "chocolate bar" is used pejoratively to describe black people.
Chapter 3 begins with Croatan efforts to be recognized by a new name to avoid the tendency of local whites to refer to them pejoratively as "Cro" or "the Cros" a reference to the stock minstrel show character Jim Crow that implied that the Robeson County Indians were in fact of mixed European, Native, and African ancestry.
All that language we've come to use rather pejoratively - 'That's a bit worthy, a bit dull, a bit odd'.
New areas include a chapter by Nekeisha Alexis-Baker on Yoder's theology of the cross and the insights of Black womanist theologians, and another by Paul Heidebrecht on how Yoder thought like an engineer even though he sometimes referred to engineering pejoratively.
Any discussion of ethnic movements, as they are pejoratively termed by proponents of Pakistani nationalism, or understanding genuine nationalist movements, as viewed by their supporters, without discussing Punjab is like staging Hamlet without the Prince of Denmark.
Ralston and Keeble argue that academic feminist theorizing and identity politics is stuck in "analysis paralysis" where women and women's groups avoid action for fear of being pejoratively labeled--a gridlock that has many negative consequences for women seeking their rights.
The kerfuffle began when a Nestle "fan"--actually a Nestle critic who had joined the open community--used a pejoratively modified version of the brand's logo (see image, left) as her Facebook photo, and others did likewise.
In fact this pejoratively used hybrid was coined in the 1980s by American environmentalist Jay Westervelt, who was incensed by the way hotels put signs up pleading with guests to reuse their towels thus "saving the environment" when they were doing nothing to promote recycling elsewhere and really, he suspected, just wanted to save on laundry bills.
In an era Jeff Cooper referred to pejoratively as the Age of the Common Man, Weaver was not a common man but was a man with distinctive and varied interests.
In the L-section, Blount says this about language: "I trust that you get your back up, as 1 do (that is to say, I get mine up) when this word is used pejoratively or dismissively.