pejorative


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pejorative

Medtalk Bad…real bad

pejorative

(pĭ-jawr′ă-tĭv) (pē″jă-rā′tĭv) [L. pejor, worse]
1. Tending to become or make worse.
2. Disparaging or belittling.
References in periodicals archive ?
In fact, it's not even necessarily pejorative in Washington.
Given that the term "plastic" often carries pejorative connotations - such as fakery, superficiality, and lack of originality - 4 Ton Vertical Storage presents a playful twist on the "plastic arts," turning the legacy of the Modernist grid into an open storehouse of possibilities.
But (pejorative expletive) and (another pejorative expletive), it's pretty safe.
Pece employs such pejorative phraseology as "inquisitional tactics" and "paternalistic attitude.
For him to see that there's a human face attached to those pejorative statements.
Review groups have a pejorative phrase for such efforts: They are called "trust-me" proposals, and they always fail to win funds.
Blinkered by ideological projections, and lacking a rigorous formalist definition of rock as music, they're unable to distinguish between rock and pop (a pejorative in Carducci's universe); they appraise music as though its essence resided in songs, storytelling, and emotional and social resonance.
In that sense, it's not surprising to see conservative magazines using libertarian as a vaguely pejorative word and scrupulously avoiding challenges to the regulatory state.
Nevertheless, the trajectory of the term--from the pejorative to the laudatory and back again--has in most cases been a star far brighter than the practices it sought to illuminate.
He calls it ``conquered land'' as if that were a pejorative.
It's not pejorative to say of an artist's paintings that they are decorative.
Sherry Stringfield (late of ``ER'') stars as Katherine, a successful book editor in New York - or, as this telefilm would have it, with a vaguely pejorative overtone, the Big City.