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peer

Etymology: L, par, equal
a person deemed an equal for the purpose at hand. A peer is usually a colleague or associate of roughly the same age or level of mental endowment.

peer

(pēr) [ME.]
One who has an equal standing with another in age, class, or rank.

peer review

The evaluation of the quality of the work effort of an individual by his or her colleagues. It could involve evaluation of articles submitted for publication or the quality of medical care administered by an individual, group, or hospital.
References in periodicals archive ?
PEERING AT REVIEW The peer review process that most journals use got its start in the early 1700s.
Classwide peer tutoring and the prevention of school failure.
The peer review debate is irrelevant to Matt Lewis, a first-year, eighth grade math teacher at James Madison High School of Excellence.
Schools have increasingly been implementing peer mediation programs as a way to help students find peaceful means for resolving conflicts (Casella, 2000).
They suggested it was now time to go back to the cathedral," recalled Archbishop Peers.
Additionally, peer relationships are important for individuals with disabilities in educational and employment settings.
Like professional counselors who are also sworn officers, peer supporters offer instant credibility and the ability to empathize.
CCP links the peer opinion leaders, or enough of them to get the job done, with specific involvement processes.
Through NPDB, Congress sought to ensure, in exchange for immunity, that the information needed for effective peer review would be accurate, complete, and available.
A useful analogy is to think of peer panels as juries, not as legislatures--management still makes the policies; panels simply decide whether management has played by its own rules.
The correlations between the other social goal types and the learning engagement constructs (effort regulation, help-seeking, and peer learning) were moderate and weak.
church in March 2002, Archbishop Peers "asked me to write him a postcard from every diocese I went to as a way to stay connected with the Canadian church.