peer

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peer

Etymology: L, par, equal
a person deemed an equal for the purpose at hand. A peer is usually a colleague or associate of roughly the same age or level of mental endowment.

peer

(pēr) [ME.]
One who has an equal standing with another in age, class, or rank.

peer review

The evaluation of the quality of the work effort of an individual by his or her colleagues. It could involve evaluation of articles submitted for publication or the quality of medical care administered by an individual, group, or hospital.
References in periodicals archive ?
Commenting on the peerage, a spokesman for Mr Corbyn, said: "Shami Chakrabarti shares Jeremy's ambition for reform of the House of Lords.
And what's more, it devalues peerages for those who have truly deserved them.
Alongside attention to the contribution of the peerage to military life and to political affairs, there are fresh themes drawn from recent historiography, including building projects, business ventures (in Ireland, the Caribbean, North America and India), education patterns, marriages, family life, life expectancy, engagement with religion, and experiences of dying together with funeral rituals.
Another former mayoral candidate, Brian Paddick, was given a peerage for the Liberal Democrats, largely in recogntion of his work with London's Metropolitan Police Service.
Even if you then take leave of absence as this gentleman has, the stain remains on this House, because you can still change your mind and hop over from Monte Carlo to pick up your peerage again any time you fancy.
I certainly did not do it because Lord Levy ever made any offer to procure a peerage or guarantee that he could do so.
Burke's Peerage & Baronetage and Burke's Landed Gentry have been the definitive source for genealogical information on leading families for nearly two centuries.
Paddy Power offer 2-5 that jailed Lord Archer is stripped of his peerage by a law change.
TALK show host Jerry Springer wants a peerage - so he can liven up the House of Lords with the knockabout style his viewers love.
Clinton and Dole can trace their ancestry to King Henry III and Presidents William Henry Harrison and Benjamin Harrison, according to Burke's Peerage, a publishing house that traces the lineage of royal and noble families.
Although, as earl of Effingham, he bore the subsidiary title of Lord Howard of Effingham, he had not used this courtesy style prior to his succession to the peerage for he succeeded his brother, not his father.
Its ability to escape political oblivion, at least for a couple of decades, forms the subject of Andrew Adonis' Making Aristocracy Work: The Peerage and the Political System in Britain 1884-1914.