peer victimization

peer victimization

(vik″tĭ-mĭ-zā′shŏn)
Teasing, harassing, bullying, or belittling of a person by another person from the same, general group, e.g., of one child by another.
References in periodicals archive ?
Why's everybody always picking on me?: Social cognition, emotion regulation, and chronic peer victimization in children.
Peer victimization can manifest in multiple forms: (a) being ostracized or excluded from a social group; (b) having peers threaten relationships with others; and (c) experiencing overt victimization, which includes threats of or actual physical violence (3,10,25).
Examining bullying and peer victimization among young children may require a different definition of bullying from the definitions traditionally offered to describe the phenomena.
Peer victimization and psychosocial adjustment in children: Current knowledge and future directions.
There are, therefore, numerous studies in the scientific literature showing a strong link between peer victimization and internalizing problems (see Hawker & Boulton, 2000, for a metaanalysis), whilst only few works have considered victimization as a risk factor for the development of externalizing problems such as violence.
As stated above, age, gender, and various peer relationship variables (prosocial behavior, asocial behavior, exclusion levels, fearful-anxiety levels, hyperactivity-distractibility, and peer victimization) may be associated with aggression.
In a new meta-analysis, researchers explored how peer victimization is related to an increased chance of suicidal ideation and suicide attempts among children and adolescents.
Peer victimization: Cause or consequence of school maladjustment?
Applying depression distortion hypotheses to the assessment of peer victimization in adolescents.
Reactions to bullying and peer victimization: Narratives, physiological arousal, and personality.
Hodges et al., A Person x Situation Approach to Understanding Aggressive Behavior and Underlying Aggressogenic Thought, in BULLYING, REJECTION, AND PEER VICTIMIZATION: A SOCIAL COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE PERSPECTIVE 125, 128 (Monica J.
Peer victimization can result in devastating consequences for children and adolescents.