peer victimization

peer victimization

(vik″tĭ-mĭ-zā′shŏn)
Teasing, harassing, bullying, or belittling of a person by another person from the same, general group, e.g., of one child by another.
References in periodicals archive ?
School-level data were provided to individual schools to inform prevention and intervention efforts to reduce peer victimization and its associated harm.
Differences Between Peer Victimization in Cyber and Physical Settings and Associated Psychosocial Adjustment in Early Adolescence.
Three items that could be considered peer victimization were removed to avoid construct overlap, as has been done in previous studies (e.
Relations between students' perceptions of school connectedness and peer victimization.
Bullying or peer victimization is traditionally defined as an aggressive, intentional act or behavior that is carried out by a group or an individual repeatedly over time against a victim who cannot easily defend him or herself (Olweus, 1993).
The variables used to determine children's levels of aggression were gender, age, prosocial behavior, asocial behavior, exclusion, fearful-anxiety, hyperactivity-distractibility, and peer victimization.
Peer victimization and psychosocial adjustment in children: Current knowledge and future directions.
In a new meta-analysis, researchers explored how peer victimization is related to an increased chance of suicidal ideation and suicide attempts among children and adolescents.
Applying depression distortion hypotheses to the assessment of peer victimization in adolescents.
Being depressed in fourth grade predicted peer victimization in fifth grade and difficulty with peer acceptance in sixth grade, according to the research.
A meta-analysis of 33 studies found a consistent relationship between peer victimization and lower academic achievement (Nakamoto & Schwartz, 2010).
The full report, Peer Victimization in Schools: A Set of Quantitative and Qualitative Studies of the Connections Among Peer Victimization, School Engagement, Truancy, School Achievement and Other Outcomes, is authored by Ken Seeley, Martin L.